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Posts tagged ‘common core’

Every Book is a Social Studies Book

I recently facilitated a conversation with elementary teachers that focused on using the C4 Framework in the K-5 social studies classroom. It was a great day – we talked about historical thinking and the use of evidence and integration of social studies with ELA and online resources and all sorts of cool stuff.

One of the most enjoyable parts of the day was the time we spent talking about and practicing the use of social studies trade books in the elementary classroom. One of the resources we used was a great book called Every Book is a Social Studies Book: How to Meet Standards with Picture Books, K-6.

First thing, it’s not just for K-6. There is stuff in there for middle school and even some high school folks. Second thing, it’s a book you need to track down. The authors, Jeannette Balantic, Andrea S. Libresco, Jonie C. Kipling, have put together an amazing collection of discipline-specific strategies along with extensive collections of trade and picture books all aligned to 10 national NCSS social studies themes. Read more

TED-Ed Clubs. Yup. TED-Ed just got better.

I’m convinced that the TED-Ed tool is one of the most under-utilized online tools ever. Where else can you incorporate sweet TED videos, YouTube videos, a variety of assessment tools, automatic scoring, flipped classroom theory, online collaboration, instant feedback to teacher and student, the power of crowds, and get it all for free?

That’s right. Nowhere else.

So.

Step one:
Head over to TED-Ed and start using it.

Step two:
Check out their latest feature. TED-Ed Clubs. Read more

Using evidence and primary analysis worksheets

There’s a cool buzz running through the history education world.

Primary sources. Documents. Using evidence. Solving problems. Historical thinking. And that’s a good thing. But I know that it can be difficult sometimes trying to figure out how to use primary sources.

First piece of advice?

Read more

Tip of the Week: I Just Fell in Love with Storehouse

The way that we communicate with one another, the way that we teach, and the way that our kids learn is becoming increasingly visual. Our brains are hardwired to focus on things beyond just text. And we now have tools, including mobile tools, that can help us take advantage of that brain hard-wiring.

And over the last few weeks, teachers and I have been messing with a variety of mobile tools that focus on visual storytelling. Including my new favorite iPad app.

Read more

The 10,000 hour myth and the value of intentional instruction

I like Malcolm Gladwell’s stuff. I especially liked his book, Outliers: The Story of Success. In Outliers, Gladwell addresses the question of what makes high-achievers successful. And he cites some of the research by Anders Ericsson demonstrating that to become an expert at something, a person needs to devote 10,000 hours practicing and working on that one thing.

Gladwell made the idea seem plausible. Even doable. And it sounds like a great idea. Work hard at something long enough and you get good at it. Even great at it.

But a recent book by Daniel Goleman debunks the 10,000 hour “mythology” and suggests a more complex truth behind Gladwell’s simplistic take on the theory. In Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence, Goldman says the 10,000 hour idea is only half true. Read more

“Breathe. Don’t worry about the test.”

I’ve been saying this for years.

Don Gifford, Kansas Department of Education social studies consultant, has been saying it.

And now?

Diane Debacker, Education Commissioner for the state of Kansas, is saying it.

What are teachers supposed to do? Just teach. Breathe. Don’t worry about the test.

What we’re trying to do is change the conversation . . . But we have lived for the past 12 or 13 years with it being all about assessment results, so it’s going to take us a little bit of time.

In an article published in this morning’s Wichita Eagle, DeBacker shared her feelings and suggestions about the new type of test being rolled out this spring. Designed to reflect new Common Core state standards, the new assessments will feature more complex questions and “technology-enhanced” items that require students to enter numerical answers, drag and drop items into correct categories, or highlight portions of text that support a central idea.

The tests will be shorter this year but questions are richer and more complex, designed to better measure students’ critical thinking skills. Read more

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