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Posts tagged ‘glenn wiebe’

A bunch of clever writing prompts

It’s been a bit hectic around here but I did run across a fun resource that listed a bunch of cool writing prompts. Buzzfeed has gathered the different ideas from around the web. And I want you to have them. Seriously. It’s my gift to you.

So.

Looking for some cool ways to unleash the creative side of your students? Go and check them out. When you’re done, head back here for a few I posted a couple of years ago.

 

You’re bringing whiteboard markers to a gun fight

I’ve talked about this in the past. Both the positive impact of technology on learning and the ability of tech to create distracted students who have difficulty thinking deeply.

I admit I’m still torn. I get it from both sides – many of my colleagues are strong supporters of tech in the classroom, of back channels, of hashtags during instruction.  And I would probably fall on that side of the argument. I do multiple tech integration workshops every semester. I’m planning a Chromebook / GAFE mini-conference. I worked with a group of folks this morning learning how to best use the Adobe Voice iPad app. I’m writing a blog post on a site titled History Tech for heaven’s sake.

But I’m running into more and more classroom teachers who are starting to be wary of the tech. There has been some interesting research about how the misuse of technology can screw with deep thinking skills and how the use of social media can be addictive. And a recent article by Clay Shirkey lays out a pretty persuasive argument for a tech naked learning environment.

So I’m torn. Read more

Tip of the Week: Constitution Day Resources 2014

It’s that time of year again. Constitution Day 2014. September 17.

You know the story. A group of guys from different parts of the country with different ideas of how to govern got together and came up with a pretty amazing document. My favorite Founding Father?

Ben Franklin. He’s kind of like the sleeper pick in your fantasy football league – everyone knows he’s out there but they ignore him because all the focus is on Jefferson or Madison or one of the other first rounders. But you draft him anyway cause you know he’s got the skills.

Ben was smart, irreverent, great with people, well-read, the ladies loved him, he had that whole kite / electricity / scientist thing working, and was by far the best part of 1776 and John Adams. What’s not to love?

And so it’s fun to go back and read some of what Ben had to say about the document he was preparing to sign: Read more

7 ways to use Google Classroom

I’m starting to sense a bit of a mancrush between Google Classroom and myself. It just seems really easy to use and I’m loving how it can start to change how we communicate with kids, assign work, start conversation, share resources. It can keep all of your kids and all of their stuff in one place while giving you the ability to quickly get and send things between yourself and your students.

Google Classroom is available to schools and districts with a Google Apps for Education (GAFE) domain so if you’re in a school that hasn’t jumped on that bandwagon yet, well . . . you’re gonna have to in order to use Classroom.

You can obviously use Classroom for lots of things such as creating a lesson with multiple documents, multimedia, and links. You can use it as a quick and easy way for students to turn in their work. But the more I think about Classroom, the more cool things I think you can do with it. So off the top of my head, here are seven: Read more

3 ways to use artifacts in the social studies classroom (and build literacy skills)

It’s day one of our Social Studies PLC and I am pumped. It’s always a great time and I’m always learning something new. The core members of the group are from the Century of Progress Teaching American History grant project but in the last year, we’ve added a ton of new people.

New people equals new ideas. New strategies and resources. So . . . yeah, it’s gonna be fun.

We’ve settled into the habit of spending our mornings focusing on a specific topic. We’ll kick off this year the same way by spending the am talking about the best ways to use artifacts as teaching tools. There’ll be a variety of things that we gonna do including: Read more

Picturing US History: Building visual literacy

Using photos, videos, and other types of images is one of the most effective ways to hook kids into your content. Images can create emotion, explain events, generate questions, and help solve problems.

But sometimes it can be difficult integrating visuals into your instruction. What images to use? What activities work best? How can you align these activities with national and state standards?

Picturing United States History: An Interactive Resource for Teaching with Visual Evidence can help. Created by the folks at the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York Graduate Center with funding support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the site is a digital project based on the belief that visual materials are vital to understanding the American past. Read more

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