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Posts tagged ‘photos’

WhatWasThere: Old pics and new maps

Lisa from Maryland stopped by the other day to browse the Google Maps Gallery post and left a quick comment about the similarities of the Maps Gallery and a site called WhatWasThere.

(Lisa works as a Secondary Social Studies Mentor in the Howard County Public Schools and also made sure to pass on another great D-Day photo source and oral history archive.)

I had never heard of WhatWasThere. I’ve heard of HistoryPin. And Histografica. And I’ve even heard of Smithsonian’s interactive maps. But WhatWasThere?

Nope. And it’s so cool. How have I not run across this before?

The WhatWasThere folks say that their project

was inspired by the realization that we could leverage technology and the connections it facilitates to provide a new human experience of time and space – a virtual time machine of sorts that allows users to navigate familiar streets as they appeared in the past.

The premise is simple: provide a platform where anyone can easily upload a photograph with two straightforward tags to provide context: Location and Year. If enough people upload enough photographs in enough places, together we will weave together a photographic history of the world.

And for the last few years, they’ve been collecting old photos and pasting them onto Google Maps around the world.

Using the site couldn’t be much simpler. Read more

Don’t go to the Retronaut photo web site. I’m serious. Don’t do it.

Okay.

I’ll be honest. I don’t know much about Retronaut. I just found out about the site this week and am still playing it. So I’m not quite sure how to explain it.

Retronaut is an archive of historical photographs. But not just normal historical photographs. The site’s tagline is:

Retronaut – see the past like you wouldn’t believe.

The photos are, mmm . . . different. As in quirky. Kooky. Unexpected. As in Lenin without a beard, Hitler signing autographs, England’s Prince Charles performing a Cossack dance, Nixon with Robocop kind of unexpected.

But trust me. Do not go to Retronaut. It’s like a re-start of a NASCAR race with three laps to go. You know there’s gonna be a crash but you can’t look away. Retronaut will suck you in and you can’t get out. I have no idea where it gets its photos but they are addictive. Do. Not. Go. There.

I’m serious. It’s too late for me. Save yourself. Read more

Tip of the Week: Old Pictures and other useful image sites

We know how powerful the integration of images in our instruction can be for our students. Part of the problem is actually finding images to use. The Library of Congress and the National Archives have some great stuff. But where else can you go when you need photos?

I’ve written a ton about where to find photos and how to use them. And I recently ran across a handy site focusing on historical images. Called Old Pictures, the site organizes its collection by themes and has some nice stuff.

Need more? Try some of these:

Multimedia Presentation Resources for Teachers
Access to a wide range of copyright free resources
Digital Librarian: Images
Huge collection of resources
Nations Illustrated
7,700 pictures from around the world
New York Public Library Photo Collection
30,000 digitized images from books, magazines & newspapers also original photographs, prints and postcards
NYPL’s Digital Gallery
Tons of historical documents!
Pics4Learning
Copyright-friendly images for educators
PictureHistory
Easy to use digital library illustrating more than 200 years of history
Picsearch – The Search Engine for Pictures
Pictures of Places
A directory of links to websites providing pictures of geographical places and sights
HumanLine
Free educational use of tons of history related images

Have fun!

Photos that changed the world

One of the most enjoyable things I do is spend time working with teachers and primary sources. There’s just nothing like a really cool document, even if it’s just one that you find online.

I especially like a good photograph. And so when I started running across different lists of “important” photos at the end of 2009, I had to stop and look.

You know the sort. Most important photos of the year, of the decade, of all time. Most important photos if you voted for Obama, if you read Twilight books, if you call it soda or pop. You get the idea.

Afghan girl at Nasir Bagh refugee camp, 1984. © Steve McCurry / Magnum Photos

But it did get me thinking. Are there lists of truly important photographs? Photos that changed the world? And if these lists exist, how could I use them in a history class?

As it turns out, those lists do exist.

A few things come to mind:

  • Ask kids why these photographs made the cut and others didn’t. What makes them special? What impact did they have, short and long term? Was the impact positive or negative?
  • Start a unit or lesson with an image from the list that is content or era specific. Provide some background and have kids predict what the upcoming unit or lesson will be about.
  • Use the Visual Discrepant Event Inquiry method with one or more of the photographs.
  • After instruction, have students create a list of possible titles for a specific photograph.
  • Put kids in smaller groups, provide access to multiple lists and force each group to create a shorter list of just five or 10. Compare lists and have each group justify their decisions.
  • Have kids list and share human geographical characteristics of an image.
  • Print out the different photos and ask students to sort them by categories. Don’t define the categories. Do them same thing with small groups. Ask them why they used the categories they did.
  • Have kids discuss what the lists would look like if a person from India selected the photographs? How about some one from eastern Europe or China or Nigeria? Are the lists above too “western?”

I’m sure you can come up with a few of your own. Let me know what works for you!

Current events squared

Can there be something more current than current events?

I used to discuss current events with my students by bringing in the morning newspaper or that week’s copy of Newsweek. We’d have a great conversation, with the intent of tying class content to events of the day.

10x10You now have another option. Current events on steroids. Not just current events but current current events.

Head over to 10×10, an automated news service that constantly scans the RSS feeds of Reuters World News, BBC World Edition and New York Times International News for updated stories. The software creates a 10 x 10 grid of pictures with a list of 100 words along the right side of the grid.

The top 100 words are chosen, along with 100 corresponding images, culled from the source news stories. At the end of each day, month, and year, 10×10 looks back through its archives to conclude the top 100 words for the given time period. In this way, a constantly evolving record of our world is formed, based on prominent world events, without any human input.

You can go back and forth between current and historic news articles:

Move your mouse around the images and you’ll see which words match which images. Move your mouse up and down the word list, and the corresponding images will light up. Click any word or image to zoom in and see the news headlines behind the word. Click the headline links to read the original news stories. Click the zoomed image a second time to see the image full screen.

To move through adjacent hours, use the “Next Hour” and “Previous Hour” buttons. You can also browse through past hours, days, months, and years. To do so, click the “History” button, and then select the year/month/day/hour you’d like to see. To view the top words for a single day, month, or year, select “Full Day”, “Full Month”, or “Full Year” from the date list.

Suddenly, the morning newspaper seems a bit out of date.

Tip of the Week – Creative Commons & Google Images

Let’s say you’re a social studies teacher looking for some multimedia resources that will enhance a Battle of Gettysburg unit. You jump over to Google Images and do a quick search using appropriate keywords. Google returns over 327,000 results.

The problem?

Copyright issues.

The question?

What can you legally use? Most of us are very used to just taking whatever we want and have been doing so for years. We often comment on how our students are downloading and sharing illegal music but don’t often see anything wrong with downloading and sharing digital media for instruction.

It’s just for classroom use and I need it. It’s not like I’m stealing anything, it’s Fair Use.

Well . . . Fair Use depends on a lot of factors. And what you might think is legal, may not be. Wouldn’t it be nice to have some sort of system in place that would answer most of your copyright issues and allow people to legally share all sorts of digital media?

You’re in luck! The Creative Commons people have worked very hard to create just such a system:

Creative Commons is a nonprofit corporation dedicated to making it easier for people to share and build upon the work of others, consistent with the rules of copyright.

We provide free licenses and other legal tools to mark creative work with the freedom the creator wants it to carry, so others can share, remix, use commercially, or any combination thereof.

The result?

People are creating and sharing digital media files in ways that allow others to use them in a wide variety of ways. It’s not so much eliminating copyright as providing a way for people to use the outdated copyright law in new ways. Basically what happens is that people create things and give other people “automatic” permission to use their work in a variety of ways – from completely unrestricted use to only non-profit, educational use with citation use.

So . . . back to your search for legal images of the Battle of Gettysburg. Google Images just recently began working with Creative Commons to update its image database. So now, for example, you can search Google Images for just photos of the Battle of Gettysburg that allow unrestricted use.

The Google guys explain it best:

To enable this feature, go to our advanced image search page. Under the “Usage rights” section, you can select the type of license you’d like to search for, such as those marked for reuse or even for commercial reuse with modification. Your results will be restricted to images marked with Creative Commons or other licenses. Once you confirm the license of the image and make sure that your use will comply with the terms of the license (such as proper attribution to the image’s owner), you can reuse the image.

Pretty simple! And you’re legal. Problem solved.

Of course, you should also encourage your students to do the same!

Other places that incorporate Creative Commons images or provide Fair Use access:

Social Studies Central Resources for Teachers
Flickr Creative Commons
FreeFoto

Morgue File
Pics4Learning
New York Public Library
Nations Illustrated

Have fun!

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