Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘primary sources’

World War One posters and artwork

I’m a huge believer in the power of visuals to encourage critical thinking and to support long-term retention. As social studies teachers we need to do a better job of finding ways to integrate visuals such as art and propaganda posters into our instructor.

Stuck for ideas and resources?

Try the Smithsonian.

Read more

The Vault: Super awesome primary source blog and resources

Finding online primary sources is never easy. While there are many online archives and tons of primary sources, we don’t always know where those archives live. Even if you can find a helpful archive online somewhere, it can be difficult tracking down exactly what you’re looking for. (This page might help a little.)

And I’m not sure today’s find is gonna help. But it is a very cool place to find primary sources that are incredibly interesting. Created and maintained by Salon, the site is called The Vault. You gotta love the site’s tagline:

Historical Treasures, Oddities, And Delights

So definitely continue to use to sites such as the Library of Congress, National Archives, and World History Documents but be sure to fav The Vault as well. Because you are going to run across stuff that is perfect for hooking your kids into a specific topic and for building content knowledge.

Some recent examples? Read more

Chronicling America – 1000s of historical newspapers

Are you kidding me? Seriously?

Thousands of historical newspapers from all over the country? Yup. And over 7,892,470 actual newspaper pages? Let that sink in for just a moment. Yup. But where, you ask, can I find such an incredible research tool? The very useful Chronicling America site from the Library of Congress, of course.

You’d think I’d be happy with almost eight million pages to play with. I mean, it’s 7,892,470 pages. Which is . . . you know, a lot. The 7,892,470+ pages cover newspapers from almost all 50 states and the District of Columbia from 1836 to 1922.

But once you get in the collection, it’s easy to get a little greedy. Wouldn’t it be nice to have some coverage from the Civil War? The Great Depression? Prohibition? WWII? Vietnam? Hippies? 9/11?

Still . . .  Read more

June 6, 1944, Dick Winters, and personal primary sources

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about my traditional summer reading list. I mentioned that I rarely finish the list – partly because I’m so easily distracted. Yeah. Well. Color me distracted.

I ran across a book called The D-Day Kit Bag. That lead me to The Dead and Those About to Die. That lead me to The Americans at D-Day which referenced events from Band of Brothers. Of course, I’ve now been back through several of the episodes from that HBO mini-series.

All of which reminded me of a post that I wrote several years ago. So in honor of the 70th anniversary of D-Day and of Dick Winters, I’ve re-posted it below.

Read more

25 ways to use the Library of Congress

I wish I would have thought of this.

I have written about the Library of Congress before. If you know me at all, you know that I love the LOC. You also know that it is an awesome place for you to find incredible resources and lesson plans.

But I have never really put all of the Library of Congress greatness together in one place.

Edudemic has.

Both of us know that so many great resources can be a bit overwhelming. And that it may be difficult for teachers to make sense of how to best use it all.

So . . . Read more

46 free history lessons aligned to Common Core

Free. Aligned to reading, writing, and communicating skills. Written by Gilder Lehrman teachers of the year so you know they’re quality.

What’s not to like?

Gilder Lehrman always has good stuff. If you haven’t already created a free teacher’s account over there, you really need to get on it. The list below is just a sample of the 46 lessons and units you can get on their Teaching Literacy Through History page: Read more

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,125 other followers