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Posts tagged ‘technology integration’

Tip of the Week: Zaption and interactive videos

I’ll be honest. I heard from a teacher in Medicine Lodge a few weeks ago about a tool called Zaption, promised myself that I’d check it out later, and then completely forgot all about. Then this morning, I get a promo email from the company detailing the tool’s “high-quality, ready-made content, intuitive interface, and rich analytics” and urging me to go to their site to learn more.

So.

Am feeling a bit unsettled. I get a lot of emails and offers of free stuff from people who are pushing their products and web sites. And I usually blow them off. Unless, of course, the price is right. I had planned to share Zaption with you anyway but doing it on the same day that I get the official sales pitch seems a bit like a sellout to the Man.

But I do really like the tool and believe there’s some nice potential for social studies teachers, especially those who are already flipping or are thinking about flipping their classrooms. I’m gonna let you decide for yourself if and when you might use Zaption. If you have an opinion one way or the other, let us know in the comments. I’d love to hear what others think of the tool.

At its most basic level, Zaption is Read more

Can you use this picture?

In the brave, new world of social media, mashups, and instant information, it becomes very easy to intentionally or unintentionally use the intellectual property of others inappropriately.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have some sort of flow chart, an infographic perhaps, to decide how and when to use images that you might find online?

Thanks to The Visual Communication Guy, there is such a thing. The Guy created a very handy guide that will walk you and your students through the process of deciding whether you should or shouldn’t use a specific image.

use this image?

Get the full version here.

Now You See It: Your brain is an iPad

I just started the book and am not even halfway through it yet. So take everything I say today with a grain of salt because I’m might be completely off track. But for many of you, this is the first week without kids and I’m pretty sure no one’s reading this anyway.

And I am liking what she has to say so . . . why not?

The she is Cathy Davidson and the book is Now You See It: How Technology and Brain Science Will Transform Schools and Business for the 21st Century. The Amazon review says that the book Read more

Smithsonian X 3D and using artifacts in your classroom

A few weeks ago, the folks over at Educational Technology and Mobile Learning posted a very cool article about the equally cool Smithsonian X3D site. The Smithsonian has over 137 million objects in its collection and is able to display 1% of that to the public. The X3D project is designed to find a way to digitize in 2D and 3D at least part of the remaining 99%.

The cool part? You can begin using the site right now to bring artifacts directly into your classroom.

We’ve always known the power of primary sources and artifacts to help our students make sense of the past. Things become much more real to kids when they can touch and hold stuff. And while the Smithsonian X3D tool doesn’t actually let them hold artifacts, it’s as real as you can get without traveling to Washington D.C.

The SIx3D viewer offers students the ability to explore some of the Smithsonian’s most treasured objects with a level of control that has never been possible until now. We hope this revolutionary level of access to the Smithsonian collections will spark your students’ curiosity and that the exploration of these objects will enable them to build lifelong observation and critical thinking skills.

Read more

Digital Learning: 4 ways not to be cranky

A couple of days ago, I was a bit cranky. Frustrated with educators who consistently refuse, for a variety of reasons, to integrate the use of technology tools into their instruction, I went off just a little.

I’m better now.

Cause I get it. I do. Teaching is hard enough without having to learn new stuff and then find ways to insert those new things into my classroom. I still believe we need to do those things but I understand the difficulty. And I think some of the teacher resistance I’ve run across is because people need more rationale, more examples, more ease of use.

So today? Read more

Digital Learning: You’re starting to make me cranky

It’s been a fun couple of months since the holiday break. I’ve had the chance to spend time with a variety of folks doing all sorts of cool stuff. A group of us have been struggling to write questions for the social studies state assessment pilot due out this spring. (Spoiler alert: more on that later this week.)

I’ve spent time with teachers discussing social studies best practices that are aligned to the state’s recently adopted state standards. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with lots of teachers as we shared ideas and discussed ways to integrate technology into instruction.

It’s all part of what is perhaps the best job in the world. I mean, who wouldn’t enjoy themselves spending time with dedicated, amazing people who literally are changing the world?

But . . . Read more

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