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Posts tagged ‘wiebe’

#NCSS14: Session Two – Connecting Your Government Class and the Real World

Presented by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, my #NCSS14 session two focused on ways to engage students directly with actual issues in their communities through direct civic action.

They suggest that you can turn your government classroom into a hands-on civics lab to teach the workings of government by empowering students.

They shared about their Civics Action Project, a  Read more

#NCSS14: Day One, Session One, Coffee, Danish, and Vincennes Lincoln High School

I have everything I need. Caffeine, danish, internet access, power outlet, and 10,000 social studies teachers all in one place.

First session?

The Digital Journey: 1:1 in Social Studies. In 2009, the Vincennes Lincoln High School Social Studies department  in Vincennes, Indiana began what it called a “digital journey.” I had a chance to hear the group speak several years ago and am curious on how things are going.

And to steal all of their great ideas.

Read more

@NCSS2014 Play ball!

It’s that time of year. Right up there with Christmas morning, NCAA March Madness opening weekend, and the two meat dinner with ribs & hot links at Roy’s Pit BBQ.

Yup. It’s NCSS conference time.

I always learn so much. Meet so many people. And I always walk away better than when I walked in.

And just like always, I’ll be trying to live blog sessions that I attend. So strap in. It’s gonna be a great ride.

A few things I’m looking forward to? Read more

5 free tools for finding fantastic current events

A few days ago, I ran across a simple list of handy current events / news resources. A few I was familiar with. Some were new. And from the Twitter conversation, I ran across a few more.

I’ve grabbed a few from the list at ClassTechTips and added a few of more own favs for a quick list of five news sites that are specifically designed for teacher use.

What’s on my list? Read more

Free Library of Congress eBooks for students

As more and more schools are moving away from paper textbooks and materials, teachers are working to answer the obvious question:

where can I find digital resources appropriate for kids?

If you and your building are using Mac computers or IOS devices such as iPads or iPods, at least part of the answer is the Library of Congress. The folks over there recently released six free iBooks that can be quickly downloaded and are perfect for having students interact with primary source evidence.

The Student Discovery Sets bring together historical artifacts and one-of-a-kind documents on a wide range of topics, from history to science to literature. Based on the Library’s Primary Source Sets, these new iBooks have built-in interactive tools that let students zoom in, draw to highlight details, and conduct open-ended primary source analysis.

(Aren’t an Apple school? The LOC is still an awesome place to find online and digital resources.)

The six books, Read more

Symbols, symbolism, and a sweet T-Chart

Just a quick post today about a very powerful strategy that’s pretty easy to integrate into your instruction. I had the privilege of sitting in on Scott’s 7th grade classroom last week when he used this activity with his kids.

Scott and his kids had just started a unit on territorial Kansas and he wanted students to get a sense of the tension that was building at the time around the issue of slavery.

His school is in the Topeka area and all of students have been to the state capital. And all of them, whether they remembered or not, have seen the massive John Steuart Curry mural of John Brown. At 11.5 feet tall and 31 feet wide, there’s a lot of stuff going on in the painting and Scott really wanted his kids to spend some quality time analyzing the content in the mural. Read more

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