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Posts tagged ‘wiebe’

Tip of the Week: Constitution Day Resources 2014

It’s that time of year again. Constitution Day 2014. September 17.

You know the story. A group of guys from different parts of the country with different ideas of how to govern got together and came up with a pretty amazing document. My favorite Founding Father?

Ben Franklin. He’s kind of like the sleeper pick in your fantasy football league – everyone knows he’s out there but they ignore him because all the focus is on Jefferson or Madison or one of the other first rounders. But you draft him anyway cause you know he’s got the skills.

Ben was smart, irreverent, great with people, well-read, the ladies loved him, he had that whole kite / electricity / scientist thing working, and was by far the best part of 1776 and John Adams. What’s not to love?

And so it’s fun to go back and read some of what Ben had to say about the document he was preparing to sign: Read more

7 ways to use Google Classroom

I’m starting to sense a bit of a mancrush between Google Classroom and myself. It just seems really easy to use and I’m loving how it can start to change how we communicate with kids, assign work, start conversation, share resources. It can keep all of your kids and all of their stuff in one place while giving you the ability to quickly get and send things between yourself and your students.

Google Classroom is available to schools and districts with a Google Apps for Education (GAFE) domain so if you’re in a school that hasn’t jumped on that bandwagon yet, well . . . you’re gonna have to in order to use Classroom.

You can obviously use Classroom for lots of things such as creating a lesson with multiple documents, multimedia, and links. You can use it as a quick and easy way for students to turn in their work. But the more I think about Classroom, the more cool things I think you can do with it. So off the top of my head, here are seven: Read more

3 ways to use artifacts in the social studies classroom (and build literacy skills)

It’s day one of our Social Studies PLC and I am pumped. It’s always a great time and I’m always learning something new. The core members of the group are from the Century of Progress Teaching American History grant project but in the last year, we’ve added a ton of new people.

New people equals new ideas. New strategies and resources. So . . . yeah, it’s gonna be fun.

We’ve settled into the habit of spending our mornings focusing on a specific topic. We’ll kick off this year the same way by spending the am talking about the best ways to use artifacts as teaching tools. There’ll be a variety of things that we gonna do including: Read more

Picturing US History: Building visual literacy

Using photos, videos, and other types of images is one of the most effective ways to hook kids into your content. Images can create emotion, explain events, generate questions, and help solve problems.

But sometimes it can be difficult integrating visuals into your instruction. What images to use? What activities work best? How can you align these activities with national and state standards?

Picturing United States History: An Interactive Resource for Teaching with Visual Evidence can help. Created by the folks at the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York Graduate Center with funding support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the site is a digital project based on the belief that visual materials are vital to understanding the American past. Read more

Tip of the Week: Tumblr in your classroom? Maybe. Just maybe.

I’ll be honest. I’m still on the fence here. Tumblr in the classroom. Yes or no? I haven’t decided but I’m wavering towards yes. If you’re not familiar with Tumblr, you need to be. Tumblr is microblogging and social networking website that many of your students are using. As of last week, there were over 200 million Tumblr blogs out there.

Think of a cross between Twitter and Facebook and you start to get a sense of what it looks like. It’s not really a tweet. It’s not really a blog. It’s not really a website. The question is

Can teachers take advantage of Tumblr to enhance teaching and learning in the classroom?

Several months ago, Terry Heick of TeachThought shared his thoughts on the question of Tumblr as a blogging tool for kids. His opinion? Yes. Read more

Stuff You Missed in History Class podcast and 5 easy ways to use it

Most of us like to think that we know a lot of history stuff. We’re great at Trivial Pursuit, Heads Up, and You Don’t Know Jack. We love reading non-fiction. We enjoy poking holes in the plots of “historical” movies and generally annoy our friends with random historical facts, Cliff Clavin style.

And, in the back of our minds, we’re always a bit concerned that someone else might just know more about history than we do. So we also are always on the hunt for additional history trivia bits.

A great place to find those cool history tidbits and extra background for your class is Read more

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