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Can you ever have too many primary sources?

The answer is . . . no.

There is always room for Jello. You can’t ever eat just one. And you can never have too many primary sources.

I spent the day working with a group of K-12 social studies teachers; took part in some great conversations and overheard others. Among other things, the group is working to create high-quality document based learning activities. They are using Document Based Questions as one of their forms of both formative and summative assessments.

I really like the idea of having kids mess around with documents and try to make sense of them. Obviously there is an art and science to writing a high-quality DBQ.

But one of the problems is finding high-quality primary sources.

So together we started to put together a short list of sites that can provide a variety of resources, activities and teaching materials. I’ve talked about NARA’s DIgital Vaults and Historical Thinking Matters. But thought you might be interested in some of the others they found:

Enjoy!

“Jello.” jmintyfreshflavor’s Photostream May 26, 2008. June 17, 2008. http://flickr.com/photos/pepperknit/2526359461
One Comment Post a comment
  1. Thanks, Glenn! This will be helpful for a lot of teachers out there!

    Some additional favorites:

    The Authentic History Center http://www.authentichistory.com/
    By far, my favorite site for not only primary text, but also songs and other artifacts.

    List compiled by Eduplace, dealing with American History and World History: http://www.eduplace.com/ss/hmss/primary.html

    American Memory from the Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html

    Avalon Project http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/avalon.htm

    EuroDocs http://eudocs.lib.byu.edu/index.php/Main_Page

    Making of America http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moagrp/ (although this one is tougher to use)

    June 18, 2008

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