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50+ tasty tools for building historical literacy

We’re all on the lookout for great materials and tools that can help as we design instruction. SHEG. Library of Congress. National Archives. Evidence Window Frames.

So it’s alway a pleasant surprise when a list of handy dandy tools and resources drops in your lap. About a week ago, I was searching for a specific online article that I had forgotten to Pocket. And . . . the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools: K-12 Social Studies resource page popped up in the results.

Instant fan.

Drew Hammill and John Nabors work as the CMS social studies gurus and they’ve put together a whole Weebly page of stuff for their K-12 teachers. But what sucked me in was their Historical Literacy page that focuses on the NCSS C3 Framework.

The point of the Framework is to help social studies folks put together seamless and effective learning activities for their students. The Framework is designed around four dimensions that follow what NCSS calls an Inquiry Arc.

It makes a ton of sense. Give kids a problem. Help them create questions, find evidence, evaluate the evidence, create a solution, communicate the solution.

The issue for many of us? The Inquiry Arc can freak people out if they’ve never been asked to design learning that looks like that. There are tons of resources to help but it can be time consuming to browse around for them. Especially in May.

And that’s where Drew and John come to the rescue.

Their Historical Literacy page has five quick and easy to use lists:

  • Helpful Sites
  • Professional Reading
  • Dimension One
  • Dimension Three
  • Dimension Four

Each list has a useful tool or article that helps us understand and implement the Framework and its specific Dimensions. And, yes, it’s late in the year and you’re trying to keep your head above water right now. So bookmark the page for later in July and August. You’ll walk away smarter and ready to jump into the first weeks of school with lessons ready to go.

5 Comments Post a comment
  1. Great resources here, Glenn. Thanks for sharing. Out school recently adopted the C3 Framework. I am always on the lookout for resources.

    May 9, 2017
    • glennw #

      Hope you find some useful nuggets in all the goodness Drew and John put together!

      Thanks for the quick comment. Good luck as you move into the C3 world!

      glennw

      May 9, 2017
  2. Tammy Waller #

    Hi Glenn.
    Love the site that was created by Drew and John. Many of the resources require permission to access. Is it appropriate to request permission or are these resources only for the teachers in that district. I am still trying to find a way to bring you to AZ.

    May 9, 2017
    • glennw #

      Tammy,

      Great hearing from you! How are things in the great state of Arizona?

      I also noticed the access issue. I don’t think it’s wrong to ask at all – I’m assuming that most of those are converted PDFs that they uploaded with the local default Google settings. The worst they can say is no.

      And, yes, I would love to come to Arizona!

      glennw

      May 9, 2017
  3. Hi Everyone,

    Thanks for the shout out Glenn! I have relied on your site for great ideas going on two years now.

    Tammy, which items were you trying to access? We try and keep our stuff open access unless we are required to have it password protected by a vendor. .

    May 9, 2017

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