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Posts from the ‘ipad’ Category

Commemorating the Great War with National Archives iPad app, resources, lesson plans

During the few hours that she has available between reading the Court of Thorns and Roses Series and finishing the Wii Zelda video game, my daughter spends a couple days a week as a volunteer intern at the National Archives Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library in Abilene. She’s had the chance to organize a ton of donated primary sources, catalog teacher materials, and watched a general from Fort Riley’s 1st Infantry Division cut a cake in half with a sword.

So . . . she’s already having a better summer that most of us can hope for.

Today I got an email from her sharing a sweet new online tool that highlights some of NARA’s resources surrounding America’s entry into World War One. (NARA has so many different teacher tools available that it can be difficult keeping up with all of it. It’s nice having a member of the crack Eisenhower staff working on the inside to keep me up to date.) So I figured I’d pass on the NARA goodness.

The United States entered World War One on April 6, 1917. To honor the 100th anniversary, the National Archives created Read more

Post-It Plus and 4 other cool iPad apps

Though some schools are moving to Chromebooks, many are still effectively using iPads in 1-to-1 settings or off carts. And it’s always nice to have a few new iPad tools lying around to experiment with. These five apps are some of my latest favorites.

Later this week? Five helpful Chromebook apps and extensions.

Post-It Plus

Collect, sort, and share student responses with actual paper sticky notes. Open Post-it Plus and create a new board. Then snap a photo of one or multiple sticky notes. Post-it Plus digitizes them, allowing you to sort the notes and share the board as a PDF.

A fun way to do word sorts, vocab review, or to brainstorm.

Floors & Bloxels
Have you always wanted to create your own video game but never knew where to start? Floors offers a simple way to create & play games – you and your kids use specific shapes on graph paper, then use the app to take a picture of your creation, and the app creates your games based on those shapes. Get free lesson plans at their website.

Bloxels works in a similar way but uses colored blocks on a matrix instead of drawn shapes. Both are perfect tools that can be used to blend literacy, STEM topics, and social studies content at different grade levels and disciplines.

Paper 53
Designed to look and seem like picking up a notebook, Paper has a handful of powerful tools that enhance the sketching experience. It’s fantastic for doodling and exploring ideas, creating beautiful illustrations, and emphasizing handwriting skills. You can sketch images and notes onto the app, and combine them with written text, photos, or checklists. It also comes with features for sharing your drafts with colleagues as PDF, Keynote or Powerpoint files.

A great way to incorporate Sketchnoting into your classroom.

Liquid Text
LiquidText offers a fast, tactile way to review, gather, and organize information across all your documents and webpages – then apply the results to writing reports, meeting prep, or simply studying. Pull out key facts and connect them together, squeeze a document to compare sections, comment on multiple pages at once, build upon your thoughts, and much more.

National Geographic Mapmaker Interactive just got better

National Geographic has always been the go-to for geography goodies. You get lesson plans, teaching resources, maps, and even more maps.

And they always have had great map making tools. But they just got better. Their MapMaker has been updated with new features, the biggest one for many of you is the ability to use the tool on mobile devices.

But they’ve also added some new interactive tools:

  • Country Facts and Flags – Explore and discover information about countries and territories around the world. Customize the fill and border colors to make this map layer your own.
  • Latitude and Longitude – See the coordinates of any place on earth.
  • Custom Text, Photos, Videos – Use markers, lines, or shapes to tell your story on MapMaker by adding in text, photos, and videos with the rich editing tool.

Start with a blank world map that allows Read more

I’m smarter now.

No real theme here today at all. Other than I’ve been reading this stuff. And, yup, I’m smarter now than I was before.

 

Need an awesome digital storytelling tool? Adobe Spark is the answer

I’ve been a fan of Adobe digital tools ever since I started playing with Voice several years ago. And have continued to fall in love as they added Slate and Post. All three provide incredibly powerful and easy to use tools for creating digital stories.

Post is designed to quickly create professional graphics. Slate focused on creating magazine style web-based stories letting you and students mix text and images in a highly visual way. Voice let you create animated videos by combining text, images, icons and themes on slides and then laid your own voice over the slides as a narrative for the finished video product.

I like that they provide both push and pull options – teachers can use them to create resources that they push out to students. Kids can use them to create products that teachers can pull in. All three tools are connected with the Adobe Creative Cloud, making it easy for users to find copyright free images to use in their projects. While not as powerful as Adobe’s pro tools such as Photoshop and InDesign, all three have some pretty amazing features making them accessible to teachers and students just by tapping buttons.

I also loved the fact that all three tools are free.

The problem was that all three were iOS only – available for iPhone and iPad users only. Eventually a web-based version of Slate did become available. But many were still locked out of the other tools.

Until this week. Read more

Integrating technology. Yes. It’s different than simply using technology

I’m spending part of  today getting ready for my METC presentation next week.

(The not so subtle self-promotion? My session on using Flipboard and Pocket as content management tools is next Wednesday at 9:45 in Junior Ballroom A, Lower Level. I’m sure once it’s finished, the presentation is gonna be great. Fingers crossed.)

And as part of my presentation prep, I’m exploring what it really means to integrate technology. I started with the idea that just because teachers or their students use technology as part of teaching and learning, doesn’t necessarily mean that they are actually integrating technology into what they’re doing.

That idea morphed into the next: Read more