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Posts from the ‘Podcasts’ Category

Educational Talk Radio, podcasts, and personal primary sources

Over the last few months, I’ve tried to be more intentional about listening to and creating more podcasts. I’ve always loved the concept of podcasts – accessing content, anywhere, anytime. Tons of people have shared with me that they love listening to podcasts while they drive places.

That’s not something I can do – listening to stuff while I drive just ends sounding like the adult voices in the Peanuts shows. I get nothing. But if that works for you . . .

Because podcasts are more than just something for us to use as a way to kill time during a commute. Podcasts can also act as a great way to connect content with students and for students to demonstrate knowledge / skills.

So. Podcasts good.

And this morning, Read more

9 history podcasts just for you: Getting smarter and having fun at the same time

Podcasts used to be a big deal. Then they weren’t. Now . . . they’re back. Yup. Podcasts are a thing again. Ten, fifteen years ago, podcasts were the shiny tool that was going to change the world. Replace sliced bread. Find a way for the Kansas City Chiefs to make the playoffs.

And for a few years, the podcast did all of those things. Then, maybe because of the learning curve needed to create them and a lack of mobile devices that made them easy to listen to, podcasts sort of just went away. But with the rise of easy to use creation tools and the huge growth of handheld smart devices, the podcast is making a comeback.

That’s good news for history and social studies teachers. We can get smarter listening to them and our kids can get smarter when we use them as instructional tools. (Plus you get to align your instruction to Common Core literacy skills such as speaking and listening.) Not sure what podcasts really are? Or not sure how to use them in your classroom? Or what it might look like if you did?

If you aren’t already listening to and using history podcasts, here are nine pretty good places to start. You’ll get smarter and have fun all at the same time.

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History Tech Podcast 5: Don Gifford, KSDE, and passionate teachers

I get the chance to work with all sorts of extraordinary people doing what I do.

Today you meet one.

Don Gifford is the Social Studies Consultant for the Kansas Department of Education and is responsible for the coordination of social studies standards, assessment, and instruction in the state. He spends much of his time working with Kansas districts and teachers to improve teaching and learning.

He’s been herding cats for the last 18 months getting the new state standards written and approved by the state Board. And as a member of the herd, I know how hard that has been! In this podcast, Don talks about the new standards, the perfect social studies classroom, and shares two pieces of advice.
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History Tech Podcast 4: Mary Madden, KSHS, and some dead guy’s bones

I had a great time talking with Mary Madden from the Kansas Historical Society earlier this week. Mary is the Director of Education and is a phenomenal resource for anyone teaching Kansas or American history.

In this short interview, Mary and I talk about the very cool KSHS Read Kansas card program, weird donations including the bones of Bloody Bill Quantrill, and some of the favorite parts of her job. Be sure to check out the links below to find even more stuff!

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History Tech Podcast: Episode Three – Tweetalongs

Besides being really fun to say, tweetalongs have the ability to connect you and your classroom activities to parents, the community, and other classrooms.

Find out more about tweetalongs and how they got started.

Use the #tweetalong hashtag to follow all sorts of folks.

History Tech Podcast: Episode Two – Lincoln the movie and historical thinking

I got the chance to watch the Lincoln movie a week or so ago. Loved it. Who would have thought? A movie about constitutional law? Interesting?

But great casting, great costuming, and great performances, especially by Daniel Day Lewis, create a great movie. My wife was concerned about the length and walked out afterwards praising the movie. Even my daughter, who is not the history geek that her dad is, said:

The movie helped me see that Lincoln is an actual person, not just some historical figure in some textbook. He played with his kids while trying to run the country. I thought that was cool.

And I learned more about the process of how laws are passed and so I plan to go to a great college and become a lawyer, supporting my father in his quest to play every golf course in the state of Hawaii.

Okay. I added that last bit. But she really did enjoy how a very important piece of American history was told in an engaging and interesting way.

But how to use the movie in the classroom?

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