Skip to content

Tip of the Week: Google Keep comes to iOS

I know that many of you already ask students to organize evidence and information for a variety of reasons – lecture capture, short-term and long-term research, group work, basic data collection, primary / secondary source analysis. We want kids to analyze evidence, validate resources, search effectively, and appropriately cite their data. And for, well . . . forever,  paper and pencil was basically the only option for this sort of thing.

Nothing terribly wrong with paper and pencil but that medium is tough to edit, update, and share. So a lot of us and our students are taking our stuff to a variety of online tools. In the last year or so, a new option has become available. Read more

NCSS offers online Teachers’ Library – tons o’ resources

The National Council for the Social Studies is a leader in promoting high-quality instruction and learning in the discipline. They provide a wide range of resources and tools for teachers including national standards, trade book suggestions, and professional development.

NCSS also has a Teachers’ Library with a collection of classroom activities, teaching ideas, and articles from Social Education, Middle Level Learning, and Social Studies and the Young Learner. Browse the collection by selecting historical period and grade level: Read more

StoryCorps, oral history, and Thanksgiving

I’ve been on the road quite a bit over the last few months and staying alert during long car rides was becoming a problem. Enter the technology. Both my kids suggested I check out the NPR RadioLab podcast, an incredibly interesting collection of incredibly eclectic topics. I listened to stories about the history of football with a focus on the Indian school in Carlisle PA to using forest fires as a way of increasing bird populations to POW camps holding captured Germans in the US to how Mel Blanc was brought out of a coma by an impression of Bugs Bunny.

Seriously. RadioLab is awesome stuff.

But that got me looking around for other things to listen to. Which led my to another  excellent NPR audio program called StoryCorps. Read more

Social media is a hook. And a tool.

In an essay titled From Connected Educator to Connected ClassroomBrianna Crowley describes her journey using social media tools at a personal level to using them in her classroom. It’s a good read with practical suggestions and links to a variety of social media tools and strategies. Brianna also makes a statement that I like: Read more

Google+ pages and communities every social studies teacher needs to follow

Okay. Full disclosure.

I have a Google+ account. I don’t use it very often.

I spend time lurking on Twitter and certain Flipboards so my social media time is pretty spread thin. To be even more transparent, there was that whole Google Wave social media experiment a few years back. So . . . I’m personally not 100% sold on the idea yet.

But I do know of teachers who’ve really bought into the Google+ universe. And I am convinced that to be a great teacher, you need to be a connected teacher. That almost always means some sort of social media. I don’t care what sort of social media. Everyone is different and finds tools that work for them.

So I’m going to keep poking around the edges of Google+. I like some of the features, Read more

Re-mastered The Civil War is going live

Most of us who channel surf – you know who you are – have a list. On that list is what some have called Shawshank movies. Named for The Shawshank Redemption, a Shawshank movie is any video that is so good that if encountered during surfing, it must be viewed to the end.

The Civil War by Ken Burns is that sort of video event. So good that if encountered by any self-respecting social studies teacher, it must be watched until the final minute. Forty million people watched the nine-part series when it first aired on PBS in 1990 and the Ken Burns love helped spark a Civil War craze. Millions purchased VHS copies of the series and the spin-off book. The film also made a star of Ken Burns.

The Civil War will be rebroadcast over five consecutive nights this week. The broadcast, which coincides with the 25th anniversary of the series’ initial broadcast in September 1990, will present for the first time a newly restored, high-definition version. This is also the first time the film will be seen with the same fidelity and framing as the negative that Burns and his co-cinematographers Allen Moore and Buddy Squires shot more than 25 years ago.

So. Read more


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 8,262 other followers