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Posts tagged ‘economics’

Federal Reserve has got the goods

Integrating economic concepts and big ideas into social studies lesson and unit design seems like it shouldn’t be a big deal. But if you’re like me, you probably don’t have a ton of econ background.

So it’s always nice to have a few handy resources rattling around in your tool kit when designing instruction. And the US Federal Reserve banking system has got you covered. With twelve regional banks around the country, each with their own education department, the Federal Reserve has an amazing storehouse of educational materials and lesson plan ideas.

To help organize their stash and to make it easier for you to find what you need, the Reserve created a dedicated site designed specifically for teachers. And you know it’s good because they names the site Federal Reserve Education. I mean, it’s right there in title.

fed res 2Start your search by selecting the link to Find Your Federal Reserve District. Then click on any one of the 12 districts, select View Resources, and narrow your results by using the filters along the left side. This allows you to browse through specific regional banks such as St. Louis or Boston. You can also search a specific region’s resources  by using the keyword search located at the top of the page. Read more

Tip of the Week: Using beautiful data to create compelling questions

Gapminder is an organization promoting sustainable global development by encouraging the use and understanding of statistics and other information about social, economic and environmental development at local, national and global levels.

Basically it’s a tool you and kids can use to compare and contrast countries around the world. So . . . teaching geography, world history, economics, comparative government? GapMinder is a tool you and your kids need to be using.

At GapMinder, you can access a variety of tools, lesson plans, and videos that help students understand the world and can help you generate a wide range of problems for your kids to solve.

One example of a lesson plan that uses GapMinder data can help your kids to think about the gaps in the world today and challenge their preconceived ideas about how the contemporary world looks. The exercise can also be used to stimulate an interest in using statistics to understand the world.

How to use the activity: Read more

Where Are the Jobs & Racial Dot Maps. What could you do with this?

I’ve been to the Fast Company network of sites in the past but I need to learn to spend more time over there, uh . . . researching possible post topics. Yeah. That’s it. Not wasting time reading interesting articles about how Batman videos have evolved over time. I’m over there investing valuable minutes tracking down very appropriate articles directly tied to education related subjects.


Okay. A few articles may be tough to defend education-wise but you’ve got four channels – Exist, Design, Create, Video – to choose from and you can find a ton of interesting reads here. If nothing else, you’ve got some great writing prompts.

A recent research trip to the Exist channel uncovered two of my favorite things: a map and another map.

The most recent map claims to highlight every single job in America with a variety of different colors. The map plots out each job with an actual dot in four simplified categories. Factory and trade jobs are red, professional jobs are blue, health care, education, and government jobs are green, and service jobs like retail are yellow.” It is interactive, allowing you to zoom and scroll from one place to another, providing a chance to see patterns both small and large. Read more

What I Eat, Hungry Planet, Material World. Your geography curriculum in three gorgeous books

I’m not exactly sure where I was or what I was doing when I first ran across Peter Menzel’s first book, Material World, A Global Family Portrait. Pretty sure it was some sort of social studies conference years ago and a vendor had some poster size images from Material World. And I was captured.

The images were powerful. The text informative and engaging. The teaching and learning possibilities endless.

It was a simple concept. Read more

Tip of the Week: Financial Literacy

Yes. I’m sure you’ve heard.

The Kansas House of Representatives introduced a bill about two weeks ago requiring a personal financial literacy program as a requirement for high school graduation. Not a bad idea at all. Of course, later amendments to the bill dropped the graduation prerequisite and added the requirement that schools teach “the importance and execution of an effective professional handshake.”

So . . . look out, global economy. Meet a kid with a firm grip and who looks you square in your eye? You know that’s a Jayhawk.

All semi-kidding aside, the intent of the Kansas House was spot on. Kids do need to a strong knowledge of economics and personal finance. Lucky for them April is Financial Literacy Month.

financial-literacy-after-high-schoolIf you’re in the need of some financial literacy ideas, Read more

Classroom Clues: K-6 Lit to teach economics

What I know about economics and personal finance? Think of the smallest possible measuring container and what I know about economics and personal finance would probably come close to filling that container.

Think of that Sam Cooke song – “Don’t Know Much About History.” Replace history with economics. That’s me.

I never had an official econ course in my life. Yeah. I know. If it makes you feel better, I have had some economics workshops and I know a lot of very smart economics people. (Looking at you Brian Richter.)

So this morning was a huge learning opportunity for me. Angela Howdeshell from the Kansas Council for Economics Education spent two hours with our social studies PLC group.

Awesome stuff.

Angela shared all sorts of great ideas and free goodies with teachers. She highlighted  some of the handy stuff on both the KCEE site as well as the national economics site.

And she shared a site I hadn’t seen before. Read more