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Posts tagged ‘gaming’

GameOn World: Geography game that plays like Kahoot

If you love Kahoot – and who doesn’t – you’re gonna love Game On.

The idea is simple. Start a game. Students browse to gameon.world on any smart device. Share a pin number with your students. Start the game. Project questions and images onto a screen. Students view questions on screen. They answer the questions on their device. Students see the results on the large screen.

And here’s the cool part. While there are a variety of topics, you can choose to focus on geography and history facts. Read more

PokemonGo: 21st century geocaching, lesson plans, & all around game changer

Maybe you missed this. Maybe you’ve been following the presidential election or the Brexit thing or bemoaning the fact that the 2015 World Series champions have lost seven of their last ten games and are now seven games back of Cleveland. You know, something trivial.

So let me catch you up.

A free mobile phone app just changed the world.

Okay. That may be just a bit of an exaggeration. But it’s not far off. Since last week, more people are using this app than Twitter. During that same period, the market value of the app’s manufacturer bumped up nine billion – that’s billion with a B – dollars. And all over the world, millions have jumped off their couches and are, wait for it Read more

Tip of the Week: Google goodies, tech tools, and various video games

I’m spending the day hanging out with the great folks at Augusta Middle. Go Bluejays!

Our time together is focused on sharing tech ideas and exploring tools. So I figured, might as well share the list of things we’re playing with today.

There’s a ton of stuff – it’s a show and tell day so we’ll demo than play than create than reflect. Pick and choose. Explore a tool at a time.

Enjoy! Read more

Explore Like a Pirate: #gbl & game-based course design

I’ve gotten to know Michael Matera over the last few years as we both went down the path of using games in the classroom. We read each other’s stuff and chatted once a while via social media. He’s connected with some of my good friends and colleagues like Kevin Honeycutt and Wes Fryer.

As a classroom teacher, Michael spent a ton of time perfecting the concept of game-based learning in the trenches with his middle school students. All while sharing his ideas and thoughts via mrmatera.com and @mrmatera.

And just so you know – if you haven’t seen his stuff – Michael’s got the juice. He’s a guy who believes in #gbl and is pulling it off with a ton of success with actual, real live kids.

So if he ever writes a book that describes how teachers can use game-based learning and gamification in the classroom, buy the book. Seriously. You’re gonna get smarter and your kids will learn more.

You already know where this is heading, don’t you? Yup. Read more

Tip of the Week: Social Studies Simulations for Sharing list

I’m not exactly clear on how and where I ran across the Social Studies Simulations for Sharing Google Doc. I’m pretty sure that Shawn McCusker, one of the original founders of the awesome #sschat hashtag / website and social studies edtech guru, created the document back in 2012. The list splashed back on the interwebs just before the 2015 holiday break and, after apparently spending the last few years watching reruns of the West Wing, I finally became aware of it.

The research behind the use of engaging learning activities such as video games and online simulations is pretty clear. More and more teachers are using these types of tools as part of their instructional design. Read more

I’ve got a new fav. It’s called Timeline and it’s awesome

It seems like I have a new favorite of some kind pretty much every week. And so, yes, today I have a new favorite game. I found it at the MidAmerica Nazarene Center for Games & Learning – the CGL is hosting their first conference today and I had the chance to do a couple of cool things as a part of the event.

One of the things I got to do today was to deliver the opening keynote. We had a great time having a conversation about how play and board games can be an important part of instruction and learning. I also had the opportunity to participate in a couple of breakout sessions.

The first session was hosted by Assistant Professor of History Elizabeth Horner. Elizabeth was one of the bleeding edge practitioners on the MNU campus who volunteered to integrate game-based learning – specifically the use of tabletop games – into her spring 2015 semester.

She led a conversation this morning focused on her experience using tabletop games to teach world and US history. She suggested that there are three ways to use games in classroom: Read more