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Posts tagged ‘Google Maps’

All Over the Map needs to be your new geo fav

Most of you know I’m a sucker for maps.

As a ten year old, I ordered a $75 historical atlas of the United States to be delivered to my house – without any way to pay for it. There were maps on the walls in my childhood room. I read, and continue to read, books about maps. I grew up poring over the map inserts in the monthly National Geographic magazine.

So you can understand why I’m pumped about All Over the Map, National Geographic’s new geography focused blog. It’s so new that there are only two posts so far. But the potential is huge. How do I know? Read more

Elementary kids and Google geo tools (that work for everybody)

I spent part of this morning spending time with Donnie Piercey. Donnie teaches grade school kids in Kentucky and is a Google genius. And he’s a social studies guy. And he uses Google mapping tools.

So when I ran across his session here at #metc16 titled Google Geo Tools for the Elementary Classroom, it was a sign. A great session with some great ideas. Get all of his goodies at this sweet Google Doc.

A few highlights: Read more

Hacking #iste2015: Virtual Globe Trotting with Google Maps

A good day so far. A few sessions this morning. Some great conversations with a some poster folks. I scored two free tee shirts and a cell phone battery charger from Google. And I spent two hours at the ESSDACK vendor booth.

Last session of the day before the awesome Tweetwood Mac / Otus / ESSDACK reception tonight? Jenn Judkins BYOD session on creating and using Google MyMaps. One of the first things I learned this morning was that MyMaps is now an option on the GAFE Google Drive Create dropdown menu.

So I am pumped that I’ll learn some new stuff this afternoon. I have my fingers crossed. If nothing else, Jenn is incredibly perky for 4:15 pm. She seriously just said

The IT guy’s name is Merlin. Shut the front door! He’s literally a technology wizard.

So . . . it’s gonna be awesome. Read more

Hacking #iste2015: Helping students experience the world using Google tools

It’s Monday morning in Philadelphia. Not really sure if that means it’s Day One or Day Two of #ISTE2015. The opening keynote was yesterday afternoon but sessions don’t start until today. Not sure how count their days. And I got here Friday for a quick Saturday am presentation at the ISTE Affiliate pre-con event so my count is off anyway.

I was busy yesterday chatting with new friends like Shauna Pollock and old ones like Levi Valdois so I missed the keynote. Pretty sure they went ahead and started without me. I’m sure ISTE thinks the first day was yesterday but to me, this is D-Day. Everyone is here, checked in, ready to attend sessions, chat up poster presenters, and nerd it up in blogger cafe.

And like every conference I get the chance to attend, I’ll try and give a bit of the flavor of what I hear and who I talk with. Not a ton of social studies related stuff but I am finding some that look really good. I’ve got a coffee and bagel so ready to go. First up? Read more

USGS Historical Topo Maps

For the last month or so, there has been a serious spring cleaning operation going on in my house. Serious. I’ve dug through boxes of stuff that I packed away almost 20 years ago and haven’t looked at since. Middle school lessons plans. Old laminated classroom posters. Folders of tests and handouts. Front pages from the Wichita newspaper documenting the first Gulf War.

And maps. Lots and lots of maps. Most of all the stuff I went through got recycled.  Some of the books and resources will be given away as door prizes during future trainings. The maps? Nope. Kept most of the those. Cause you can never have too many maps. There’s just something about a good paper map.

But I also understand the power of digital. As much as I enjoy spreading out a 1939 world atlas, the ability of an online or tech-based map to blend and display huge amounts of data can’t be beat. Google Maps. Google Earth. ERSI. Rumsey Georeferencer. StoryMaps.

And now you’ve got the United States Geological Survey folks with even more goodies. The USGS has always been great about creating and sharing educational resources. But now they’ve created a new handy tool for finding and using historical topographic maps. Read more

Free Google Earth Pro. And other Google Earth goodies

Most of you already know about my love for all things Google. Their stuff always works. It’s always high-quality. And for the most part, it’s always free.

One of my favorite tools has always been Google Earth. I use it a ton. It gives you and your students a chance to connect people & place and events & place. It provides big picture data and encourages problem solving. And it’s always been free.

Except for Google Earth Pro. Pro is, well . . . more awesomer. More features. More fun stuff like a HD Movie Maker. High resolution images. Extra layers not available on the free version. More measurement tools. So while it is more awesomer, Earth Pro would run you $399 for the privilege.

Until now.

Google Earth Pro is now free.

Read more