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Posts tagged ‘hunger games’

Top Ten Posts of 2015 #1: Mockingjay lesson plans and resources

I’m sure most of you are doing the same thing I’m doing right now. Spending time with family and friends, watching football, catching up on that book you’ve been dying to read, eating too much, and enjoying the occasional nap.

Between now and the first week in January, you’ll get a chance to re-read the top ten posts of 2015. Enjoy the reruns. See you in January!

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It’s coming. If you haven’t been paying attention and don’t know what I’m talking about, chat for a few minutes with some of your students. I’m guessing that they can help you out.

Yup. That’s right. The last half of Mockingjay, the third and final Hunger Games movie opens November 20. It’s guaranteed  to set records for ticket sales after it opens.

Why?

Cause people love the book. Seriously love the book.

I became very aware of the power that Katniss and other Hunger Games characters have on people when my daughter and wife started reading the series several years ago. And the more I talked with them and as they shared more about the story, I began to realize the possibilities for integrating that story into social studies instruction.

Way back in September 2010, I wrote: Read more

5 new and 15 old equals 20 Hunger Games: Mockingjay lesson plans and resources

It’s coming. If you haven’t been paying attention and don’t know what I’m talking about, chat for a few minutes with some of your students. I’m guessing that they can help you out.

Yup. That’s right. The last half of Mockingjay, the third and final Hunger Games movie opens November 20. It’s guaranteed  to set records for ticket sales after it opens.

Why?

Cause people love the book. Seriously love the book.

I became very aware of the power that Katniss and other Hunger Games characters have on people when my daughter and wife started reading the series several years ago. And the more I talked with them and as they shared more about the story, I began to realize the possibilities for integrating that story into social studies instruction.

Way back in September 2010, I wrote

I’ve heard from some that this sort of thing is too much like “entertaining” students. That we shouldn’t have to use pop culture to teach social studies. I disagree. I will use pretty much whatever it takes to engage kids in content. And if the relationship between Katniss, Peeta and Gale hooks students into a better understanding of civic and geographic concepts, we ought to be all over it.

I still believe that. The Hunger Games series gives us a wonderful hook for teasing out some amazing social studies themes and topics: Read more

Holiday Goodie Rerun III: Hunger Games lesson plans, resources, and activities

I’m sure most of you are doing the same thing I’m doing right now. Spending time with family and friends, watching football, catching up on that book you’ve been dying to read, eating too much, and enjoying the occasional nap.

Between now and the first week in January, you’ll get a chance to re-read some of the top posts of 2014. I may decide to jump in with something current but if I don’t, enjoy this Holiday Goodie rerun.

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October 9, 2013
Added a post highlighting 8 Hunger Games lessons and resources

March 26, 2012
I added a post concerning the Hunger Games serieswith links to lessons plans and more maps.

September 2, 2010
Original post focusing on geography

 

It’s coming. If you haven’t been paying attention and don’t know what I’m talking about, chat for a few minutes with some of your students. I’m guessing that they can help you out.

Yup. That’s right. The third and final movie version of the Hunger Games Trilogy (okay . . . just the first half of the third book. I hate when they do that.) opens November 21 and is already setting records for advanced ticket sales. And it’s likely that the movie will continue to set records after it opens.

Why?

Cause people love the book. Seriously love the book.

I became very aware of the power that Katniss and other Hunger Games characters have on people when my daughter and wife started reading the series four years ago. And the more I talked with them and as they shared more about the story, I began to realize the possibilities for integrating that story into social studies instruction.

Way back in September 2010, I wrote

I’ve heard from some that this sort of thing is too much like “entertaining” students. That we shouldn’t have to use pop culture to teach social studies. I disagree. I will use pretty much whatever it takes to engage kids in content. And if the relationship between Katniss, Peeta and Gale hooks students into a better understanding of civic and geographic concepts, we ought to be all over it.

I still believe that. The Hunger Games series gives us a wonderful hook for teasing out some amazing social studies themes and topics.

Hope. And courage. Loyalty and trust. Democracy. The power of the media. Control vs. freedom. The cost of war and violence.

There have been, and will continue to be, conversations about the violence in the series. Author Suzanne Collins shares her thoughts: Read more

Tip of the Week: 21 Mockingjay and Hunger Games lesson plans

It’s coming. If you haven’t been paying attention and don’t know what I’m talking about, chat for a few minutes with some of your students. I’m guessing that they can help you out.

Yup. That’s right. The third and final movie version of the Hunger Games Trilogy (okay . . . just the first half of the third book. I hate when they do that.) opens November 21 and is already setting records for advanced ticket sales. And it’s likely that the movie will continue to set records after it opens.

Why?

Cause people love the book. Seriously love the book.

I became very aware of the power that Katniss and other Hunger Games characters have on people when my daughter and wife started reading the series four years ago. And the more I talked with them and as they shared more about the story, I began to realize the possibilities for integrating that story into social studies instruction.

Way back in September 2010, I wrote

I’ve heard from some that this sort of thing is too much like “entertaining” students. That we shouldn’t have to use pop culture to teach social studies. I disagree. I will use pretty much whatever it takes to engage kids in content. And if the relationship between Katniss, Peeta and Gale hooks students into a better understanding of civic and geographic concepts, we ought to be all over it.

I still believe that. The Hunger Games series gives us a wonderful hook for teasing out some amazing social studies themes and topics.

Hope. And courage. Loyalty and trust. Democracy. The power of the media. Control vs. freedom. The cost of war and violence.

There have been, and will continue to be, conversations about the violence in the series. Author Suzanne Collins shares her thoughts:

One of the reasons it’s important for me to write about war is I really think that the concept of war, the specifics of war, the nature of war, the ethical ambiguities of war are introduced too late to children. I think they can hear them, understand them, know about them, at a much younger age without being scared to death by the stories. It’s not comfortable for us to talk about, so we generally don’t talk about these issues with our kids. But I feel that if the whole concept of war were introduced to kids at an earlier age, we would have better dialogues going on about it, and we would have a fuller understanding.

And for social studies teachers, you’ve got politics and geography. (especially the geography!) Economic decisions. Connections to historical events. Connections to contemporary events.

But what might that look like in the classroom? What resources are out there? Read more

8 Hunger Games lesson plans, resources, and activities

Updated:

November 14, 2014
Uploaded a post with links to Hunger Games lesson plans and resources with a focus on social justice.

Past Posts:

March 26, 2012
I added a post concerning the Hunger Games series with links to lessons plans and more maps.

September 2, 2010
Original post focusing on geography

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If you’ve been under a rock for the last few years and haven’t heard, The Hunger Games trilogy is kind of a big deal. The books and movies have created quite a buzz. For my son, Harry Potter was a huge part of his growing up. But for many of today’s tweeners and teens, including my daughter, The Hunger Games series is the storyline that has been part of their growing up years.

And with the second movie coming out in a few months, you can take advantage of the intense interest to introduce a wide variety of social studies topics into your instruction. Geography. Regions. Governmental power. Civic disobedience. Propaganda. Economics. Supply and demand. The list seems endless.

But if you’re stuck a bit coming up with specifics, check out some of the lesson plans, resources, activities, and worksheets listed below: Read more

Hunger Games – Lesson plans, worksheets, and handouts

Updated:

November 14, 2014
Uploaded a post with links to Hunger Games lesson plans and resources with a focus on social justice.

October 9, 2013
Added a post highlighting 8 Hunger Games lessons and resources

Past post:

September 2, 2010
Original post focusing on geography

——

No.
I haven’t read it.

Yes.
I have seen it.

It seems like everyone I talk to has read The Hunger Games trilogy. Everyone I talk to tells me that I have to read it. Probably won’t happen. (I told my daughter that when she reads Stephen Ambrose’s Band of Brothers, I’ll read The Hunger Games.)

So I have heard quite a bit about Katniss and District 12 and Peeta and . . . well, pretty much all of it. I also spent almost three hours last Friday night watching the movie. I get it. It’s a great story of courage, loyalty, oppression, and overcoming injustice.

A few years ago when the books were just coming out, I thought that there were pieces in the Hunger Games that teachers, especially geography teachers, could use to hook kids into instructional content. I liked the idea of using the Districts within the story to lead kids into some great discussion and learning about regions, human geography, and geography’s impact on who we are.

And there were some who disagreed.

But I said it then and I’ll continue to say it:

Some suggest that we shouldn’t have to use pop culture to teach social studies. I disagree. I will use pretty much whatever it takes to engage kids in content. And if the relationship between Katniss, Peeta, and Gale hooks students into a better understanding of civic and geographic concepts, we ought to be all over it.

At the time, teachers were pretty much on their own because there just wasn’t a lot out there to help integrate social studies themes from the Hunger Games into their instruction. That’s changed. A lot of stuff, both free and commercial, is now available.

I especially like the maps. And it’s interesting to notice how they all seem a bit different.

One quick exercise I would use would be to simply ask kids to compare and contrast the maps and then discuss why they might look different. If students have read the book, you might have kids create their own map and justify why their map looks the way it does. This could lead into a deeper look at US regions and how where we live affects who we are.

I’ve listed some more things below. You can find Panem maps, lesson plan ideas, worksheets, handouts, and a variety of other goodies.

Enjoy!

Update May 4, 2012

Teaching with the Hunger Games

Map Links

Lesson Plan and Other Resources Links

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