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Posts tagged ‘summer’

9 Social Studies Resources for the End of School

For many of you, the count may already be down to single digits. May and June aren’t the easiest months of the year and I know that you’re hacking your way through the next few weeks, trying to stay on top of stuff. But it doesn’t have to be painful. These resources can help.

Start with this End of the Year Top 10 from @gingerlewman:

Highlights?

  • Breathe
  • Highlight your wins and wishes
  • Thank others
  • Don’t worry so much about grading

Then browse through this quick list of lessons and activities that might make your life a little easier:

And don’t forget the seriously important evaluations from students asking about our teaching practice. You probably already have an instrument that you use to get student feedback but in case you need something, bounce over to this earlier History Tech post for some suggestions.

Have fun the last few weeks – you can do this!

Summer reading list 2018: Five books that will make me smarter

Long time History Tech readers already know this. Every summer, I make a list of books I plan to read between now and September. Long time History Tech readers also know this. Not once, not ever, a couple of times I came close but never ever, have I actually finished the list.

There’s always been something. I get distracted with a new book that comes out or some event happens that pulls me in a different direction. But some day . . . some day, it’s gonna happen. I’m trying to be realistic this year. Part of me says; yes, this summer it’s gonna happen – you’re going on a long anniversary trip to a tropical beach without the tech. Tons of time for book reading while sipping cool beverages under an umbrella.

The other part of me says; not a chance – as soon as you get home, the World Cup starts and the rest of June and part of July are shot to h, e, double hockey sticks. So we’ll see. (But it does help with the reading goal that the US team apparently forgot how to play the game and didn’t qualify, giving me less reason to watch. Go Iceland.)

The whole idea here got started moons ago when I first started teaching and some very smart people encouraged to not take the summers off. They’re the perfect time for learning, they said. Read a book, they said. Maybe two or more, they said.

So I did. And they were right. We need to keep learning, keep asking questions, keep moving forward. And what better time for that than between now and September? Some summers I start with a specific theme. This year? Not so much. Just a few books that look interesting or fun to read.

Here’s the 2018 list – fingers crossed: Read more

Tip of the Week: 7 Resources for the End of School

I know that many of you are just trying to survive the next few weeks so something short and sweet. Browse through this quick list of lessons and activities that might make your life a little easier:

Good luck and have fun!

 

Tip of the Week: Summer Reading List 2017

This year may be a little tough. My July is scheduled full of days that I get to spend with social studies teachers around the country. But my hopes are high.

Regular History Tech readers already know this – every summer since I finished my first year as a middle school US history teacher, I’ve put together a summer reading list. Several teachers down the hall had taken me into their inner circle and suggested, very strongly, that I needed to do more during the summer months than life guard and paint houses – that growing professionally over the summer was a non-negotiable. This professional growth might include some sort of face to face professional learning opportunity but it definitely included creating a personal reading list.

Best. Advice. Ever. It’s really more than just a reading list – it’s the idea that teachers need to continually work on honing their craft and a summer reading list is a practical way to make that happen. So . . . I picked some books with content. Some with process. Some for fun. And started the fall semester smarter than when I left in the spring. So have been doing it ever since.

The problem is that I have never, not once, not ever, finished my summer list. And July obligations and an extensive honey-do list makes it unlikely that 2017 is the year I actually cross the finish line.

Sigh.

But I’m still creating the list. Cause . . . you know. It could happen. I could finish. I’m not kidding around this year. Seriously.

There’s no real theme this summer. Just a few books that look interesting and that should make me better at what I do: Read more

Tip of the Week – EDSITEment reading list (and a few others)

A couple of days ago I posted my annual Summer Reading List. Of course, I never actually finish the list. There’s always something that ends up changing my direction – usually it’s because a book sounds a lot better than it actually is.

But there’s hope. There are tons of lists lurking out there ready to help me find just what I need. So if you’re looking for some summer reading or even if you’re looking for some great reads for your kiddos, check out the following:

Read more

Tip of the Week – Summer reading list

I know many of you are looking forward to summer and a more relaxed schedule.

Aren’t we all?

I always look forward to summer because it usually means more time to read stuff I didn’t get to during the winter. So my summer reading list is all planned out and ready to go!

But it got me thinking . . . what books should social studies teachers read?

So . . . today, two lists. First, the books I plan to read this summer and, second, my very short, very biased list of books that I think every social studies teacher will enjoy. (Don’t like what’s on the list? Find just about anything by Stephen Ambrose, Sarah Vowell, Tony Horowitz, Steven Johnson or David McCullough.)

Your homework? Pick at least one to read and discuss with another history buff.

What I Plan to Read This Summer:

(And, no, I probably won’t get to all of them. But it’s fun to dream!)

Some of my favorites in no particular order:

Additions? Subtractions?