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Posts tagged ‘technology integration’

Use Timeline JS and Juxtapose for historical thinking awesomeness

Several weeks ago, I gushed about a new tool I had just run across called StoryMap JS. It seemed like an easy to use, nice to look at tool for creating interactive, multimedia historical accounts. Perfect for pushing out teacher created content to students and for pulling in student created content.

And guess what?

That’s right. KnightLabs at Northwestern University, the makers of StoryMap, have some other tools as well. They’ve created something called Read more

Using Graphite: App smashing in the social studies classroom

If you’re not spending time on the Graphite web site, uh . . .  what are you doing instead? Because I’m gonna suggest that you’ve got a problem with your priorities.

Looking for a handy site that helps you locate useful apps, games, and websites that also provides ratings and reviews? That also includes teacher feedback? That has awesome search and sorting functions? That organizes all of its goodies by Common Core – giving you the chance to find activities aligned to ELA literacy standards for history?

What you’re looking for is Graphite

. . . a free service from nonprofit Common Sense Education designed to help preK-12 educators discover, use, and share the best apps, games, websites, and digital curricula for their students by providing unbiased, rigorous ratings and practical insights from our active community of teachers.

Their team of professional educators – early childhood development experts, doctorates in education, and teachers with hands-on classroom experience – rates each website, game, and app on Graphite based on their detailed rubric. Every product on Graphite is rigorously reviewed to dig deeper into what and how your students will learn with it.

Start with the basics. Head straight Read more

Chrome extensions: 13 you need to be using

It’s been a Googlely kind of week.

Much of what I’ve been doing for the last ten days or so is to have great conversations with teachers learning how to best use a variety of Google tools. The problem, of course, is that there are so many to choose from and so many ways to use them. But we’ve been having fun sharing ideas, lesson plans, and tips.

One of the things we always talk about are ways to take advantage of the Google Chrome browser. I was a heavy Firefox user until about two years ago. I liked Firefox but we switched over bigtime to a Google Apps for Ed environment here at ESSDACK and using the default Google browser just seemed to make more sense.

And like many Firefox users, I loved the ability to integrate add-ons and extensions. When I moved to Chrome, I looked for that same ability to customize my browsing experience. Google and the Chrome Web Store didn’t disappoint.

There a wide variety of free and useful browsers extensions available for the Chrome browser. So if you work in a GAFE school, are thinking about switching to Chrome, or already use Chrome but just aren’t sure what all the fuss is about, read on. Read more

15 virtual field trips, online museums, and other assorted digital goodness

I spent a great day yesterday with about 300 social studies teachers chatting about all sorts of strategies that can engage learners. One of the things we discussed was the use Google Cardboard and virtual reality. Cardboard is a great way to explore all sorts of places around the world.

But part of our conversation, especially with elementary teachers, was that Cardboard requires a smart phone. For most grade school classrooms, cell phones will be difficult. And it’s not just elementary teachers that might struggle getting Cardboards and devices. Middle and high school teachers shared concerns about equity and access.

An alternative would be to focus on other types of virtual field trips. So today? A few suggestions: Read more

How to Transform the Social Studies Classroom in 140 Characters or Less: #mcss16

Twitter is a powerful tool. But what can it look like in a social studies classroom? Missouri teacher Jordan McGaughey spent a hour this morning sharing his ideas of using Twitter as a teaching, learning, and professional development tool. 

Jordan started by sharing what the use of Twitter can look like at different levels of Bloom’s. I really like this image – great way to jumpstart personal and professional conversations:

blooms and twitter

So what are the ideas? Read more

NowComment: Easy, powerful, and collaborative evidence analysis

I am always amazed at the things I randomly run across while online. Between all of the RSS feeds, news apps, and social media connections, cool stuff just shows up at the weirdest moments.

Last week I spent some time with a group of teachers talking about collaborative tech tools. During our intentional play time, a few of us went searching for a specific tool that we had used several years ago but that none of us could remember. So we constructed a set of Google Search keywords and filters that we thought would find what we were looking for.

And what we ended up with is my new favorite tool for collaborative document analysis.

Titled  Read more

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