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Posts tagged ‘technology integration’

Need some EdTech Gear advice?

I’ve always enjoyed Jonathan Wylie’s stuff. He’s got fingers in lots of pies spending time at the Grant Woods AEA Digital Learning Team, on Twitter, and his own incredibly useful site. He always has great ideas, I especially like his How To posts.

Late last year, he developed something new called EdTech Gear Guides. We’re all looking for the best ways to integrate technology into our instructional designs. And there’s always a ton of great ideas out there but it can be difficult getting all of the details and gadgets and tools and gear to actually pull off that great idea.

That’s where EdTech Gear Guides can help. The guides are: Read more

21st century social studies: tips, tools, and tricks at #maceks17

It’s day one of #maceks17 and it’s already awesome. Meeting old friends and making new ones. I get the chance to do a couple of things today – help man the ESSDACK booth and do an afternoon session. Excited about both. Hanging out at the table gives me the chance to meet lots of different teachers and hear all sorts of stories about what is working in classrooms.

And spending time with social studies teachers talking about technology?  That’s the sweet spot.

But if you’re reading this, chances are you missed MACE and the afternoon session. I get that. Not everybody gets the chance to hangout with the #maceks17 folks. So if you’re curious about the 21st Century Social Studies: Tip, Tools, & Tricks preso, here’s quick summary of what we talked about: Read more

I feel smarter

No real topic at all here today. But after finishing a great day of learning with 25 super bright social studies teachers, I feel smarter. So just a few of the random things I picked up today and a few others that  I’ve been reading, thinking, and talking about.

Cause if I can get smarter, anybody can get smarter.

Top Ten Posts of 2016 #6: Integrating technology. Yes. It’s different than simply using technology

I’m sure most of you are doing the same thing I’m doing right now. Spending time with family and friends, watching football, catching up on that book you’ve been dying to read, eating too much, and enjoying the occasional nap.

But if you need a break from all of the holiday cheer, we’ve got you covered. Between now and the first week in January, you’ll get a chance to re-read the top ten History Tech posts of 2016. Enjoy the reruns. See you in a couple of weeks!


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I’m spending part of  today getting ready for my METC presentation next week.

And as part of my presentation prep, I’m exploring what it really means to integrate technology. I started with the idea that just because teachers or their students use technology as part of teaching and learning, doesn’t necessarily mean that they are actually integrating technology into what they’re doing.

That idea morphed into the next: Read more

History Nerdfest 2016: Ten Tech Tools for Teaching Social Studies

I had the chance to drop in on a quick 30 minute Power session that focused on ten tech tools for teaching civics. Three minutes of overview for each tool and a bit of fast discussion on how it might be used.

NewsELA
A site that allows users to read current event articles at different Lexile levels/ They also have a new section that does the same thing for primary sources – perfect for modifying documents to make them more accessible.

Twitter
Presenters shared a series of hashtags that social studies teacher can follow:

  • tlap
  • sstlap
  • sschat
  • whapchat
  • hsgovchat
  • pyschat
  • worldgeochat

I would also suggest using a curating tool such as HootSuite or TweetDeck to help sort and organize the information that will come pouring in while following this hashtags. Read more

Post-It Plus and 4 other cool iPad apps

Though some schools are moving to Chromebooks, many are still effectively using iPads in 1-to-1 settings or off carts. And it’s always nice to have a few new iPad tools lying around to experiment with. These five apps are some of my latest favorites.

Later this week? Five helpful Chromebook apps and extensions.

Post-It Plus

Collect, sort, and share student responses with actual paper sticky notes. Open Post-it Plus and create a new board. Then snap a photo of one or multiple sticky notes. Post-it Plus digitizes them, allowing you to sort the notes and share the board as a PDF.

A fun way to do word sorts, vocab review, or to brainstorm.

Floors & Bloxels
Have you always wanted to create your own video game but never knew where to start? Floors offers a simple way to create & play games – you and your kids use specific shapes on graph paper, then use the app to take a picture of your creation, and the app creates your games based on those shapes. Get free lesson plans at their website.

Bloxels works in a similar way but uses colored blocks on a matrix instead of drawn shapes. Both are perfect tools that can be used to blend literacy, STEM topics, and social studies content at different grade levels and disciplines.

Paper 53
Designed to look and seem like picking up a notebook, Paper has a handful of powerful tools that enhance the sketching experience. It’s fantastic for doodling and exploring ideas, creating beautiful illustrations, and emphasizing handwriting skills. You can sketch images and notes onto the app, and combine them with written text, photos, or checklists. It also comes with features for sharing your drafts with colleagues as PDF, Keynote or Powerpoint files.

A great way to incorporate Sketchnoting into your classroom.

Liquid Text
LiquidText offers a fast, tactile way to review, gather, and organize information across all your documents and webpages – then apply the results to writing reports, meeting prep, or simply studying. Pull out key facts and connect them together, squeeze a document to compare sections, comment on multiple pages at once, build upon your thoughts, and much more.