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Posts tagged ‘twitter’

Tip of the Week: 5 things every social studies teacher needs to know about Twitter

I joined Twitter about nine years ago in late 2007. As a social studies guy trying to learn more about how tech could be used in instruction and learning tool, I was a bit underwhelmed during my first few months with the tool.

Most posts fit the stereotypical – I learned a lot about what people did the night before, what they ate the night before, and how disappointed they were about the third Pirates of the Caribbean movie. But it got better. And I am becoming more and more convinced that Twitter is now one of the those non-negotiable things that we all should have in our tool belts.

It’s not the silver bullet that will solve all of your problems (And I will admit it may create some.) But it does do some pretty handy things – we can connect with experts, connect our students with experts, connect with each other, find and share content, ask questions, help others, and apparently save the world at the international, national, state, and local levels.

So today five things I think all of us need to know about Twitter. (New to Twitter? Get set up here. And remember that you can have multiple Twitter accounts – so think about creating both personal and professional versions.) Read more

How to Transform the Social Studies Classroom in 140 Characters or Less: #mcss16

Twitter is a powerful tool. But what can it look like in a social studies classroom? Missouri teacher Jordan McGaughey spent a hour this morning sharing his ideas of using Twitter as a teaching, learning, and professional development tool. 

Jordan started by sharing what the use of Twitter can look like at different levels of Bloom’s. I really like this image – great way to jumpstart personal and professional conversations:

blooms and twitter

So what are the ideas? Read more

Social media is a hook. And a tool.

In an essay titled From Connected Educator to Connected ClassroomBrianna Crowley describes her journey using social media tools at a personal level to using them in her classroom. It’s a good read with practical suggestions and links to a variety of social media tools and strategies. Brianna also makes a statement that I like: Read more

This Twitter hashtag is genius

On a scale of one to ten, with ten being a person whose phone never leaves their hand and one being someone who has absolutely no clue what social media is, I’m probably around a seven.

And while I do have Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube accounts, much of my social media time is spent messing with Twitter. I use Twitter quite a bit – mostly lurking on #sschat, #gafe, and #edtech – using Flipboard and Hootsuite as my access points. Like most of you, I’ve fallen into the habit of using one favorite social media tool. It’s comfortable. People can find me. I can find them. I get useful ideas and resources. Everybody’s happy.

And I get it. To be a true 21st century educator, I suppose I need to be using all of the different platforms. But seriously. Who has that kind of time?

So if your tool of choice isn’t Twitter, feel free to move along. Nothing to see here. Cause this awesome genius tip isn’t for you. It’s for Twitter users. Unless . . . you know, you’re just a little bit curious. Then, sure, definitely hang around. Read more

7 social media strategies teachers need to use and intentionally teach

I had the chance to work with the awesome Dr. Curtis Chandler yesterday during the ESSDACK Chromebook conference at MidAmerica Nazarene University, sharing a few ideas for teaching and learning in a Googley world. And, no, neither of us are completely sure that Googley is an actual word. But if Google is using the word, so can we. We defined Googley very simply – the world that we teach in, and that your kids live in, revolve around constant access to information and to other people. So what should education look like in that sort of environment? We focused on three basic ideas:

  • Grapple with big ideas
  • Focus on the process
  • Be intentional about using social media

Curtis took the social media section and rocked it. I loved that he started the conversation by quoting Mark Twain: Read more

Who in government is editing Wikipedia?

(I just re-read the title to this post. It’s sounds like I’ve been watching too many conspiracy movies. But I’m gonna stick with it. It seems to fit. Feel free to rewrite it after you’re done here. Just know that we’ll know that you rewrote it. Cause we have those kind of interweb skills.)

I’ve talked quite a bit about Wikipedia and how I think it’s a good option for kids and teachers.

Some argue that because different people can edit Wikipedia entries, that those entries can’t be trusted. I would argue just the opposite . . . that because so many people can edit entries and so many people monitor changes to the entries, that the entries become more trustworthy.

I called it open source history.

Do you really know who writes your textbook? What credentials do they have? What bias do they bring to the process? What sources do they use to write their books? Who fact checks them? How do you know what influence the Texas State Board of Education played in “editing” their “entries?”

When a single person and a single group becomes the one responsible for controlling information and knowledge, we should all be concerned.

Having said that, it is important that we monitor and fact check Wikipedia entries. And that happens constantly. The good news is that we now have the option of using social media tools to do some of that monitoring for us.

Every Wikipedia article, and any revisions to that article, is tracked and monitored. If a change in an entry is made, the IP address of the computer that made the change is tracked and recorded. And for most major articles, there are Wikipedia editors that constantly update and edit entries – working to make each article as accurate and error free as possible.

So even if a change is made anonymously, that change can be tracked back to the source and if needed, that edit can be corrected.

Okay. A lot of tech nerd talk but what’s the basic idea here? Read more

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