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Posts tagged ‘wiebe’

So many geography resources! How many? Sooo many

What does it look like when we combine inquiry learning with geography? What resources are available? Check out some ideas and materials below:

Helpful article:

Inquiry lesson examples:

Geography: Read more

Explorable explanations and 4 ways to encourage active reading

I love Sylvia Duckworth’s version of the SAMR tech integration model. The whole idea of any ed tech is to support student learning. And the SAMR is a nice way to think about the tech you’re using or planning to use. Is this just substituting for paper and pencil or is this true redefinition? Something that we couldn’t have done without the tech?

One level in the SAMR model is not necessarily better or worse than another. But it can help help us stop and think about appropriate usage. And a spat of reading over the weekend about a recent edtech idea had me flashing back to Sylvia’s version.

First called “explorable explanations” by a guy named Bret Victor, the idea can take reading to high levels of modification and redefinition. Victor, in his 2011 article, starts with a question: Read more

Tip of the Week: The problem with history classes, the Civil War, and hexagons

Several days ago, I wrote a quick post highlighting an article from The Atlantic titled The Problem with History Classes. In it, author Michael Conway suggests that traditional social studies instruction that focuses on the “right” answers doesn’t allow for enough academic discomfort. Social studies teachers need to go beyond basic foundational knowledge and create a sense of ambiguity and uncertainty in how things are going to work out.

One suggestion from Conway? If our students really are going to learn and master historical thinking skills, it is “absolutely essential that they read a diverse set of historians” and learn how a variety of historians who are scrutinizing the same topic can reach different conclusions.

But what can that look like? You may want to try an activity using hexagons – it’s an activity that can help your students grapple with historical viewpoints and start to understand connections between them.

The concept has been around for a while with lots of teachers using hexagons as part of a larger idea called SOLO. The basic idea is that Read more

Helping your kids find their bless

It was the perfect storm this morning as print smacked head on into digital. The most recent issue of Wired magazine includes an article titled The Power of Boredom. And my Flipboard highlighted a post from Brain Pickings called How to Find Your Bliss: Joseph Campbell on What It Takes to Have a Fulfilling Life.

I’ve written a bit about this before but the intersection of these two articles resurrected the idea that we need to intentionally plan time away from tech, to find a quiet space, to be bored every once in a while.

Why? Because Read more

Creating a document-based lesson

I ran across this infographic yesterday and love the information that it contains. We know that we need to create these sorts of lessons but are sometimes a bit unsure of what that can look like. User bschultz75 posted their version of what a document-based lesson looks on the Piktochart site and I figured I would pass it on to you.

(I can’t find any info on who bschultz75 actually is but whoever you are, thanks for the great graphic!)

The rest of you? Read more

Academic discomfort and the problem with history classes

More than several years ago, I asked my daughter, a fourth grader at the time, to work her way through the very cool Plimoth Plantation’s You Are the Historian simulation. It’s a wonderful online tool that asks kids to answer a very simple question – what really happened at the first Thanksgiving. Using evidence and video clips from experts, elementary students develop a thesis and create a final product that addresses the problem.

And I wanted a product review from a true end user. Used to these sort of requests from her history nerd father, Erin plunged in. During the in-depth debriefing over milk and cookies, I asked her a variety of questions about her experience. Much of the conversation is now forgotten but I still remember what she said when I asked her to tell me one thing that she would share with her teacher the next day.

The past is what really happened. And history is what we say happened.

I couldn’t have been prouder.

Of course, Read more

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