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Posts tagged ‘youtube’

Top Ten Posts of 2015 #3: 5 tasty YouTube channels perfect for history geeks

I’m sure most of you are doing the same thing I’m doing right now. Spending time with family and friends, watching football, catching up on that book you’ve been dying to read, eating too much, and enjoying the occasional nap.

Between now and the first week in January, you’ll get a chance to re-read the top ten posts of 2015. Enjoy the reruns. See you in January!

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Yup. I’m a history geek. I’m a member of the History Book Club, I love maps, I stop and read every historical marker before driving past, I spent most of a morning several months ago quizzing the docent in the Northfield, Minnesota history museum on the 1876 raid by the James Gang, and I have the Band of Brothers DVD series memorized.

So where do I go when I need a good YouTube history video?

Here are five very sweet YouTube channels that are great places to start: Read more

Print out a YouTube video. Handy tool or shiny gadget?

Yup. Print out a YouTube video. Holy sweet Googly tech trick, Batman!

When you are watching any video on the YouTube website, the storyboard (the images that appear just above the play bar when slide your cursor along it) for that video is automatically downloaded in the background. The Print YouTube tool stitches all of those storyboard image frames into one large poster that you can then download as a PDF or print out.

To get started, you drag the Print YouTube bookmarklet to your bookmarks toolbar. Then open any video on YouTube, click the bookmarklet link, and the storyboard images are instantly generated. These storyboards offer a visual summary of videos and you can generate them for short videos as well as full-length movies.

But mmm . . . this seems like a perfect example of the question we should be asking every time we find out about a new tech tool: Read more

1,000,000 minutes of historical YouTube goodness (and cat videos)

What could you do with one million minutes of historical YouTube video clips? If I’ve done my arithmetics correctly, that’s almost 7000 days or just over 19 years worth of video goodness. What could you do with that many video clips?

Deliver a base of foundational knowledge. Hook students into content. Develop writing prompts. Supplement instructional. Create a playlist of subject and period specific clips. Generate interest in a topic. Design a PBL unit around a series of related videos.

If your brain isn’t already bouncing off the walls in your head with other possible ideas, head over to the AP and Movietone YouTube channels to check out thousands of online video resources. I will guarantee that you’ll leave the vault with all sorts of possibilities.

According to their press release, the Associated Press and British Movietone, one of the world’s most comprehensive newsreel archives, are together bringing more than 1 million minutes of digitized film footage to YouTube. Showcasing the moments, people and events that shape the world, it will be the largest upload of historical news content on the video-sharing platform to date. Read more

Sweet Googleness: Goggle tools, tips, tricks – Part Deux

Yesterday I shared something most of you already know. I love the Google. I’m getting into the idea of Keep and Tasks, my new favorite Google tools. Yesterday, you got a few of my favorite Google Search tips and tricks.

Today? Google Drive and YouTube. Read more

Holiday Goodie Rerun IV: 5 tasty YouTube channels perfect for history geeks

I’m sure most of you are doing the same thing I’m doing right now. Spending time with family and friends, watching football, catching up on that book you’ve been dying to read, eating too much, and enjoying the occasional nap.

Between now and the first week in January, you’ll get a chance to re-read some of the top posts of 2014. I may decide to jump in with something current but if I don’t, enjoy this Holiday Goodie rerun.

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Yup. I’m a history geek. I’m a member of the History Book Club, I love maps, I stop and read every historical marker before driving past, I spent most of a morning three weeks ago quizzing the docent in the Northfield, Minnesota history museum on the 1876 raid by the James Gang, and I have the Band of Brothers DVD series memorized.

So where do I go when I need a good YouTube video?

Here are five very sweet YouTube channels that are great places for you and your kids.

HipHughes History
Keith Hughes has taught US History and Government and AP American Government for the past 15 years as well as edu classes in New Literacy and Technology for the Graduate School of Education at the University of Buffalo.

HipHughes History is a series of upbeat, personable and educational lectures designed for students and lifelong learners. Videos primarily focus on US History and Politics but span across World History and general interest. So sit back and enjoy the antics of HipHughes as he melds multimodality into a learning experience.

Crash Course – US History

Six awesome courses in one awesome channel. This one focuses on US History.

Crash Course – World History
This one focuses on, wait for it . . . World History.

C. G. P. Grey
Complex things explained. Very cool videos on a variety of topics. History geeks will start with the history ones but don’t be afraid to branch out.

Horrible Histories
Hilarious history videos from the BBC. And almost all of them historically accurate!

Copycat Horrible Histories
The BBC Horrible Histories generate so much traffic, others have jumped on the bandwagon.

Need an extra bonus additional channel?

Vsauce
Our World is Amazing. Mind-Blowing Facts & The Best of the Internet.

Enjoy!

HBO, The March of Time, and free historical videos

It’s never easy finding short video clips that you can use in a history or geography class. Thanks to HBO’s YouTube channel, it’s gotten just a little easier.

HBO has created a series of playlists that includes a variety of old and new video clips. And they seem like a perfect fit for talking about human geography and regions or for using as introductory activities to different history topics.

My favorite? Read more

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