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Posts tagged ‘common core’

#METC15 sessions – Google, close reading, and other assorted tech goodness

I’m in the beautiful state of Missouri at the 2015 METC in St. Charles. The #METC15 folks do a great job of creating a very positive learning environment centered around the idea of technology integration. So a good time for me to share some ideas and gather new stuff from others.

(I’ll be live blogging here throughout the day so be sure to refresh for most recent version.) Read more

Tip of the Week: Zoom In! The future of historical thinking

I always enjoy the annual social studies nerd fest that is the National Council for the Social Studies annual conference. I learn a ton and I love the sessions. But it’s the chance to meet all kinds of people that I enjoy the most.

It seems like I’m always bumping into someone I know or someone who knows someone I know. Or . . . well, if you’ve had the chance to attend you understand. The people make the conference.

And it was in St. Louis in 2013 that I got the chance to meet some folks from the Center for Children and Technology, a division of the Education Development Center. The CCT people were there talking about a new online tool called Zoom In! and I happened past their booth in the vendor area.

My first impression?

Two words. Game changer.

Seriously. If you’re a middle or high school US history teacher, this is something that you need to try. I’m not kidding. Read more

9 history podcasts just for you: Getting smarter and having fun at the same time

Podcasts used to be a big deal. Then they weren’t. Now . . . they’re back. Yup. Podcasts are a thing again. Ten, fifteen years ago, podcasts were the shiny tool that was going to change the world. Replace sliced bread. Find a way for the Kansas City Chiefs to make the playoffs.

And for a few years, the podcast did all of those things. Then, maybe because of the learning curve needed to create them and a lack of mobile devices that made them easy to listen to, podcasts sort of just went away. But with the rise of easy to use creation tools and the huge growth of handheld smart devices, the podcast is making a comeback.

That’s good news for history and social studies teachers. We can get smarter listening to them and our kids can get smarter when we use them as instructional tools. (Plus you get to align your instruction to Common Core literacy skills such as speaking and listening.) Not sure what podcasts really are? Or not sure how to use them in your classroom? Or what it might look like if you did?

If you aren’t already listening to and using history podcasts, here are nine pretty good places to start. You’ll get smarter and have fun all at the same time.

Read more

Hstry: Free 21st century timelines that are awesome

December was a busy month. I had stuff going on. You know . . . college basketball season had kicked in, those pesky Christmas lights, the Star Wars VII trailer was out. Normal December stuff.

So I missed it. Back on December 4, I missed a post by Richard Bryne over at Free Technology for Teachers highlighting a very cool new timeline tool that I think you need to try out. If you’ve already been over there, feel free to re-watch the trailer. Or you could make yourself useful – use the new tool to create a timeline and share it in the comments.

But if you’re like me and didn’t get the chance to browse through the December 4 post, hang around a bit. I’ve had the chance to hear from others who’ve used it and tried myself – and you need to head over there yourself.

Hstry is a Read more

Holiday Goodie Rerun VI: Using evidence and primary analysis worksheets

I’m sure most of you are doing the same thing I’m doing right now. Spending time with family and friends, watching football, catching up on that book you’ve been dying to read, eating too much, and enjoying the occasional nap.

Between now and the first week in January, you’ll get a chance to re-read some of the top posts of 2014. I may decide to jump in with something current but if I don’t, enjoy this Holiday Goodie rerun.

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There’s a cool buzz running through the history education world.

Primary sources. Documents. Using evidence. Solving problems. Historical thinking. And that’s a good thing. But I know that it can be difficult sometimes trying to figure out how to use primary sources.

First piece of advice? Read more

Writing Navigator: Supports literacy standards, makes your life easier, free

With the coming of the Common Core Literacy Standards for History / Government, the NCSS national standards, and the adoption of new social studies standards in Kansas, I’ve seen a ton of classroom teachers get stressed out about the whole reading and writing thing.

I get it.

For a long time, classroom teachers were told that simple memorization of content was good enough. And now? Expectations have changed. It’s can just be lecture, quiz, worksheet, test anymore. We’re being asked to train kids to read, write, and communicate solutions.

And classroom teachers are freaking just a bit:

  • My kids won’t ever be able to do this.
  • I’m a government teacher, not a reading teacher.
  • How are we supposed to grade this?

I get it. It’s new. It can be a bit intimidating.

We all can use a little help now and again. And if we could find some sort of free, online tool that scaffolds the writing process for our students, even better.

If only there were such a tool available, what a Merry Christmas this would be. If only. Read more

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