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Posts tagged ‘google’

Hacking #iste2015: Driving creativity with Google Drive apps

Day two of #iste2015. I had meetings all morning and did a podcast with Dr. Curtis Chandler, formerly of ESSDACK. Now prof at BYU North in Idaho.

Spent some time at the ESSDACK booth and an incredible hour in the ISTE Playground listening to Matt Farber and Greg Toppo share their thoughts about gaming and technology. More on that in tomorrow’s post.

Today’s first actual session focuses on using Google apps. Aaron Svoboda is planning to share how Drive Apps can get teachers and students to address the toughest digital age skill – creativity.

I work with a ton of districts who are moving to GAFE and Google tools. So I’ve got high hopes for some very cool stuff because the session will focus on third party apps. You know. Not the typical Docs, Sheets and Slides that we all use. Or even the Forms, Drawing, or Maps apps that not very many of us use. But those apps that you can find under the More option in the New dropdown menu. Read more

Hacking #iste2015: Virtual Globe Trotting with Google Maps

A good day so far. A few sessions this morning. Some great conversations with a some poster folks. I scored two free tee shirts and a cell phone battery charger from Google. And I spent two hours at the ESSDACK vendor booth.

Last session of the day before the awesome Tweetwood Mac / Otus / ESSDACK reception tonight? Jenn Judkins BYOD session on creating and using Google MyMaps. One of the first things I learned this morning was that MyMaps is now an option on the GAFE Google Drive Create dropdown menu.

So I am pumped that I’ll learn some new stuff this afternoon. I have my fingers crossed. If nothing else, Jenn is incredibly perky for 4:15 pm. She seriously just said

The IT guy’s name is Merlin. Shut the front door! He’s literally a technology wizard.

So . . . it’s gonna be awesome. Read more

Hacking #iste2015: Helping students experience the world using Google tools

It’s Monday morning in Philadelphia. Not really sure if that means it’s Day One or Day Two of #ISTE2015. The opening keynote was yesterday afternoon but sessions don’t start until today. Not sure how count their days. And I got here Friday for a quick Saturday am presentation at the ISTE Affiliate pre-con event so my count is off anyway.

I was busy yesterday chatting with new friends like Shauna Pollock and old ones like Levi Valdois so I missed the keynote. Pretty sure they went ahead and started without me. I’m sure ISTE thinks the first day was yesterday but to me, this is D-Day. Everyone is here, checked in, ready to attend sessions, chat up poster presenters, and nerd it up in blogger cafe.

And like every conference I get the chance to attend, I’ll try and give a bit of the flavor of what I hear and who I talk with. Not a ton of social studies related stuff but I am finding some that look really good. I’ve got a coffee and bagel so ready to go. First up? Read more

Use Google Public Database Explorer. Your kids get smarter

The shift is on. We’re moving beyond simple rote memorization and direct instruction to a more hands on, interactive and evidence-based learning method. We want kids to solve problems and communicate solutions.

That’s a good thing.

But as we all get better at giving kids problems to solve and asking them to use evidence to solve those problems, it’s easy to focus on certain types of evidence. Diaries. Journals. Speeches. Photos. Maps. You know . . . the basic types of primary source documents many of you having been using forever. Absolutely nothing wrong with those types of evidence. Heck, secondary sources work too.

What can start to happen, though, is that we rely too much on the old reliables and never ask kids to use more complicated kinds of things. And one type of evidence that we need to start using more is the huge amount of public data that is available. Statistics. Population numbers. Demographical data. Movement of people and materials. This kind of stuff is perfect for creating authentic problems and encouraging creative solutions by your students.

The problem, of course, is that the data has been hard to access and even harder to make sense of. But there is a solution. Right there in plain sight. Most of us just missed it. Read more

Tip of the Week: Google PD and training tools

The Google pool is deep and very wide. There seems like there’s never an end to the tools, handy extensions, and online resources available from the Googleplex. You’ve got search, maps, notes, docs, spreadsheets, drawings, videos, photos, bookmarks, email, calendars, html, news, books, blogs, online classrooms, digital conversations, research, language translation. Heck, there was even a movie a few years ago.

So, yes, I get it when I see teachers struggle with learning the Googles. It can a bit overwhelming. There’s just so much to figure out.

What to do?

Use Google, of course. Read more

New Google Classroom update: Little things that make it a big deal

The Google folks have been busy – and it seems as if they’ve been listening to teachers. Today, a few handy updates to Google Classroom were announced. If you’re not using Classroom, you really need to take a few minutes, perhaps, to come to your senses. It is a handy time saver and teaching tool that’s free, accessible anywhere, easy to use, and did you know it’s free? The biggest update is the ability to now Read more

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