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Posts tagged ‘social media’

Historical social media creation tool

Imagine a social media campaign during the 1860 election.

What would Twitter posts from the Lincoln campaign look like? How might Stephen Douglas have used Facebook? Breckinridge and Instagram? Would Bell have posted video?

One of the conversations we had today in our spring social studies PLC was the use of social media tools both with current and historical events. Is it productive to encourage the use of social media and smart devices in the classroom? We didn’t really solve anything.

But we had fun discussing it.

We did chat about some instructional possibilities. One of those involved having kids develop a social media campaign for past elections. If current social media tools were available to historical figures, what would the branding look like? What platform would people of the past have used? What would they say? Could kids take speeches, letters, photos, from past elections and create messages for social media?

I think the answer is Read more

Tip of the Week: 5 things every social studies teacher needs to know about Twitter

I joined Twitter about nine years ago in late 2007. As a social studies guy trying to learn more about how tech could be used in instruction and learning tool, I was a bit underwhelmed during my first few months with the tool.

Most posts fit the stereotypical – I learned a lot about what people did the night before, what they ate the night before, and how disappointed they were about the third Pirates of the Caribbean movie. But it got better. And I am becoming more and more convinced that Twitter is now one of the those non-negotiable things that we all should have in our tool belts.

It’s not the silver bullet that will solve all of your problems (And I will admit it may create some.) But it does do some pretty handy things – we can connect with experts, connect our students with experts, connect with each other, find and share content, ask questions, help others, and apparently save the world at the international, national, state, and local levels.

So today five things I think all of us need to know about Twitter. (New to Twitter? Get set up here. And remember that you can have multiple Twitter accounts – so think about creating both personal and professional versions.) Read more

National Archives Education Updates & 58 other NARA social media links

The National Archives has billions of documents, artifacts, and historical resources. And I’m beginning to think that it has almost that many blogs, social media accounts, and RSS feeds.

This morning, I got dragged into the NARA world of social media after discovering the very cool Education Updates blog.

I ran across the Updates blog through one of my Flipboard feeds and started browsing. NARA staffers use the site to share resources for teachers and learners. You’ll find new teaching tools, lesson plans, learning activities, student field trips, professional development opportunities, newly available primary sources, and multimedia and web content.

The National Archives holds all kinds of valuable documents – written documents, images, maps, audio, video, charts, and more – from all three branches of our government. Educational liaisons at the National Archives in Washington, DC, around the country, and in Presidential Libraries work together to share how they use all of these different types of sources in teaching activities.

And just when I thought I was out, they sucked me back in.

I was done. I had gotten my weekly primary sources fix. But Read more

Social media is a hook. And a tool.

In an essay titled From Connected Educator to Connected ClassroomBrianna Crowley describes her journey using social media tools at a personal level to using them in her classroom. It’s a good read with practical suggestions and links to a variety of social media tools and strategies. Brianna also makes a statement that I like: Read more

Google+ pages and communities every social studies teacher needs to follow

Okay. Full disclosure.

I have a Google+ account. I don’t use it very often.

I spend time lurking on Twitter and certain Flipboards so my social media time is pretty spread thin. To be even more transparent, there was that whole Google Wave social media experiment a few years back. So . . . I’m personally not 100% sold on the idea yet.

But I do know of teachers who’ve really bought into the Google+ universe. And I am convinced that to be a great teacher, you need to be a connected teacher. That almost always means some sort of social media. I don’t care what sort of social media. Everyone is different and finds tools that work for them.

So I’m going to keep poking around the edges of Google+. I like some of the features, Read more

This Twitter hashtag is genius

On a scale of one to ten, with ten being a person whose phone never leaves their hand and one being someone who has absolutely no clue what social media is, I’m probably around a seven.

And while I do have Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube accounts, much of my social media time is spent messing with Twitter. I use Twitter quite a bit – mostly lurking on #sschat, #gafe, and #edtech – using Flipboard and Hootsuite as my access points. Like most of you, I’ve fallen into the habit of using one favorite social media tool. It’s comfortable. People can find me. I can find them. I get useful ideas and resources. Everybody’s happy.

And I get it. To be a true 21st century educator, I suppose I need to be using all of the different platforms. But seriously. Who has that kind of time?

So if your tool of choice isn’t Twitter, feel free to move along. Nothing to see here. Cause this awesome genius tip isn’t for you. It’s for Twitter users. Unless . . . you know, you’re just a little bit curious. Then, sure, definitely hang around. Read more

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