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Posts tagged ‘social media’

Social media is a hook. And a tool.

In an essay titled From Connected Educator to Connected ClassroomBrianna Crowley describes her journey using social media tools at a personal level to using them in her classroom. It’s a good read with practical suggestions and links to a variety of social media tools and strategies. Brianna also makes a statement that I like: Read more

Google+ pages and communities every social studies teacher needs to follow

Okay. Full disclosure.

I have a Google+ account. I don’t use it very often.

I spend time lurking on Twitter and certain Flipboards so my social media time is pretty spread thin. To be even more transparent, there was that whole Google Wave social media experiment a few years back. So . . . I’m personally not 100% sold on the idea yet.

But I do know of teachers who’ve really bought into the Google+ universe. And I am convinced that to be a great teacher, you need to be a connected teacher. That almost always means some sort of social media. I don’t care what sort of social media. Everyone is different and finds tools that work for them.

So I’m going to keep poking around the edges of Google+. I like some of the features, Read more

This Twitter hashtag is genius

On a scale of one to ten, with ten being a person whose phone never leaves their hand and one being someone who has absolutely no clue what social media is, I’m probably around a seven.

And while I do have Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, and YouTube accounts, much of my social media time is spent messing with Twitter. I use Twitter quite a bit – mostly lurking on #sschat, #gafe, and #edtech – using Flipboard and Hootsuite as my access points. Like most of you, I’ve fallen into the habit of using one favorite social media tool. It’s comfortable. People can find me. I can find them. I get useful ideas and resources. Everybody’s happy.

And I get it. To be a true 21st century educator, I suppose I need to be using all of the different platforms. But seriously. Who has that kind of time?

So if your tool of choice isn’t Twitter, feel free to move along. Nothing to see here. Cause this awesome genius tip isn’t for you. It’s for Twitter users. Unless . . . you know, you’re just a little bit curious. Then, sure, definitely hang around. Read more

7 social media strategies teachers need to use and intentionally teach

I had the chance to work with the awesome Dr. Curtis Chandler yesterday during the ESSDACK Chromebook conference at MidAmerica Nazarene University, sharing a few ideas for teaching and learning in a Googley world. And, no, neither of us are completely sure that Googley is an actual word. But if Google is using the word, so can we. We defined Googley very simply – the world that we teach in, and that your kids live in, revolve around constant access to information and to other people. So what should education look like in that sort of environment? We focused on three basic ideas:

  • Grapple with big ideas
  • Focus on the process
  • Be intentional about using social media

Curtis took the social media section and rocked it. I loved that he started the conversation by quoting Mark Twain: Read more

You’re bringing whiteboard markers to a gun fight

I’ve talked about this in the past. Both the positive impact of technology on learning and the ability of tech to create distracted students who have difficulty thinking deeply.

I admit I’m still torn. I get it from both sides – many of my colleagues are strong supporters of tech in the classroom, of back channels, of hashtags during instruction.  And I would probably fall on that side of the argument. I do multiple tech integration workshops every semester. I’m planning a Chromebook / GAFE mini-conference. I worked with a group of folks this morning learning how to best use the Adobe Voice iPad app. I’m writing a blog post on a site titled History Tech for heaven’s sake.

But I’m running into more and more classroom teachers who are starting to be wary of the tech. There has been some interesting research about how the misuse of technology can screw with deep thinking skills and how the use of social media can be addictive. And a recent article by Clay Shirkey lays out a pretty persuasive argument for a tech naked learning environment.

So I’m torn. Read more

Tip of the Week: Tumblr in your classroom? Maybe. Just maybe.

I’ll be honest. I’m still on the fence here. Tumblr in the classroom. Yes or no? I haven’t decided but I’m wavering towards yes. If you’re not familiar with Tumblr, you need to be. Tumblr is microblogging and social networking website that many of your students are using. As of last week, there were over 200 million Tumblr blogs out there.

Think of a cross between Twitter and Facebook and you start to get a sense of what it looks like. It’s not really a tweet. It’s not really a blog. It’s not really a website. The question is

Can teachers take advantage of Tumblr to enhance teaching and learning in the classroom?

Several months ago, Terry Heick of TeachThought shared his thoughts on the question of Tumblr as a blogging tool for kids. His opinion? Yes. Read more


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